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Vallarta Real Estate: Is a Condo Right For You?

From an Article By Geoff Williams,



AMPI is the national association of real estate professionals that have, since 1956, gathered under laws and codes of ethics and conduct to create a reliable, trustworthy and efficient real estate environment in Mexico.

AMPI consists of separate autonomous sections all throughout the nation, as well as more than 4000 associates and affiliates. Each section is independent and has its own board of directors, only surpassed by a national board of directors comprised of twenty associates from all over the republic.

Developed over the years with the input and knowledge of its members, AMPI is much more than just a collection of offices. AMPI has been a solid and recognized institution in Mexico for the past 27 years. It was originally established in 1956 and was consolidated in 1980. AMPI is currently represented in all the principle cities and regions of Mexico stretching from Tijuana to Cancun.

Vallarta Real Estate: How To Choose The Right Agent

From an Article By AUGUST 5, 2016 in REAL ESTATE

With real estate agents, “we don’t have the information that we have about other service professionals,” says Stephen Brobeck, executive director of the Consumer Federation of America, in Washington, D.C. Still, there are methods for sizing up an agent’s record — and potential.

Whether you’re a buyer or seller, here are 7 ways you can find out more about an agent before you hire.

Learn more about your agent before hiring

  1. Talk with recent clients.
  2. Look up the licensing.
  3. Pick a winner.
  4. Select an agent with the right credentials.
  5. Research how long the agent has been in business.
  6. Look at their current listings.
  7. Ask about other houses for sale nearby.

1. Talk with recent clients

Ask agents to provide a list of what they’ve listed and sold in the past year, with contact information, says Ron Phipps, past president of the National Association of Realtors, or NAR. Before you start reaching out to people the agent has worked with, ask if anyone will be “particularly pleased or particularly disappointed,” he says.

With past clients, “I’d like to know what the asking price was and then what the sales price was,” says William Poorvu, adjunct professor emeritus at Harvard Business School and co-author of “The Real Estate Game: The Intelligent Guide to Decision-making and Investment.”

If you’re selling, ask if the previous properties were similar to yours in price, location and other salient features, Poorvu says. What you want is someone who specializes in exactly what you’re selling.

Another good question for sellers is: How long were the homes on the market?


2. Look up the licensing

States will have boards that license and discipline real estate agents, says Phipps. Check with your state’s regulatory body to find out if a prospective agent is licensed and if there have been any disciplinary actions or complaints. The information may be posted online.


3. Pick a winner

Peer-given awards count, says Phipps. One that really means something is the “Realtor of the Year” designation awarded by the state or local branch of NAR.

“These agents are the best as judged by their peers,” he says. “That’s a huge endorsement.”


4. Select an agent with the right credentials

Doctors have specialties, and so do real estate agents. Even generalists will get additional training in some areas. So, the alphabet soup after an agent’s name can be an indication that the person has taken additional classes in a certain category of real estate sales. Here’s what some of the designations mean:

  • CRS (Certified Residential Specialist): Completed additional training in handling residential real estate.
  • ABR (Accredited Buyer’s Representative): Completed additional education in representing buyers in transactions.
  • SRES (Seniors Real Estate Specialist): Completed training aimed at helping buyers and sellers in the 50-plus age range.

If the agent calls herself a Realtor with a capital “R,” that means she’s a member of NAR. By hiring a Realtor, “the most important thing you get is an agent who formally pledges to support the code of ethics,” says Phipps.


5. Research how long the agent has been in business

A state licensing authority will often be able to tell you how long an agent has been selling real estate. Or, you can just ask the agent directly.

“If they haven’t been in business 5 years, they’re learning on you and that’s not good,” says Robert Irwin, author of “Tips & Traps When Buying a Home.”

Ultimately, what you’re looking for is someone who is actively engaged in a particular area and price range, says NAR’s Phipps. You’ll want an agent to demonstrate knowledge of the area and homes in your range and show “what kind of market presence they have,” he says.


6. Look at current listings

Check out an agent’s listings online, says Brobeck, of the Consumer Federation. Places to look include the agency’s own website and sites such as Realtor.com, which offer a searchable online database of properties in the Multiple Listing Service.

Most buyers start their search on the internet, and you want an agent who uses that tool effectively. “A key thing is an attractive presentation on the web,” Brobeck says.

Look at how closely the agent’s listings mirror the property you want to buy or sell. Are they in the same area? Is the price range similar? And does the agent have enough listings to indicate a healthy business but not so many that you’d just be a number?


7. Ask about other houses for sale nearby

A good agent should know about other area properties that are available “off the top of his head,” says Irwin. Mention a house in your area that’s sold recently or is for sale. If the agent knows the property and can give you a few details, that means he or she really knows your area, he says. “You want someone like that, who’s on top of the market.”



AMPI is the national association of real estate professionals that have, since 1956, gathered under laws and codes of ethics and conduct to create a reliable, trustworthy and efficient real estate environment in Mexico.

AMPI consists of separate autonomous sections all throughout the nation, as well as more than 4000 associates and affiliates. Each section is independent and has its own board of directors, only surpassed by a national board of directors comprised of twenty associates from all over the republic.

Developed over the years with the input and knowledge of its members, AMPI is much more than just a collection of offices. AMPI has been a solid and recognized institution in Mexico for the past 27 years. It was originally established in 1956 and was consolidated in 1980. AMPI is currently represented in all the principle cities and regions of Mexico stretching from Tijuana to Cancun.

Vallarta Real Estate: How To Stage on a Budget

From an Article By Lindsay Lambert Day This post originally appeared on LearnVest.

You don’t have to be an avid HGTV viewer to recognize the value in sprucing up your home before putting it on the market. In fact, a Coldwell Banker survey found that staged homes—those deliberately decorated with an eye toward enticing buyers—tend to sell in half the time that non-staged properties do. And with the home-selling season starting to heat up, it’s more important than ever that your parcel of real estate stand out from the pack. But hiring an expensive home staging service isn’t the only way to plant a “SOLD” sign in your front yard. Bearing a few key tips in mind, DIYers can primp and polish their homes into prime selling shape themselves—at a price that won’t break the budget. Ready to give it a go? Melissa Barronton, the owner of Atlanta-based fynHome Staging & Redesign and a professional redesigner who specializes in sprucing up homes for sale, shares six, simple home staging ideas—each clocking in at under $40.

486919821Home Staging Hack #1: Roll Out a Welcome Mat “First impressions are everything when selling your home,” Barronton says. Plus, prospective buyers usually linger by the front door before the real estate agent opens a home for viewing—so an enticing entrance is key. The best bang for your staging buck? A new welcome mat, which can cost as little as $15. “A fresh, modern mat—selected in the style of your home—convinces the buyer to see more,” Barronton says. A little bit of green by the front door also goes a long way. “I recommend adding fresh plants to an entry area, which will signal to the buyer that the home is well cared for,” she says.

Home Staging Hack #2: Mount Mirrors in Strategic Spots Even the most handsome of homes have one: that dim hallway or small space where natural light goes to die. Your spruce-up solution: Hang a few mirrors. “They add extra light to rooms that look dark, and make rooms appear spacious,” explains Barronton. Bonus tip: Mirrors pack extra punch when placed next to—or directly across from—a window, since they’ll pull in more sun. But instead of simply slapping a big mirror on the wall, bring a real wow factor to a room by artfully arranging mini mirrors of all shapes and sizes. “Collages of small mirrors are very inexpensive to buy at home or discount stores,” Barronton says. “And when placed together, they’ll appear to double the size of a space.”

Home Staging Hack #3: Set Tables and Serving Areas for Entertaining Happy is the home that’s filled with friends, food and laughter. So give potential buyers a sneak peek of life as a host in your home—by setting the scene. “When I stage properties, we always set the tables and bar areas,” Barronton says. “It shows the property is primed for entertaining.” And it doesn’t have to be a fancy setup: Simply lay out cloth napkins, wineglasses and solid plates in the dining room. As for a kitchen island or breakfast table, opt for matching mugs and bowls to inspire the feel of family meals.

Home Staging Hack #4: Replace Personal Pics with Artwork Over the years, you’ve turned your house into a home by filling it with portraits and other family mementos. But remember that you want prospective buyers to envision themselves living in your home. “And that’s really hard to do when pictures of you are everywhere,” Barronton says. So swap those personal pics hanging on your walls for canvas artworks. “They will show up well in listing photos, and also create a focal point for your home,” Barronton says. Plus, you can typically buy paintings of landscape scenes, modern shapes or floral motifs for less than $40 a piece at hobby stores like Michael’s or at Bed, Bath & Beyond. Another smart staging suggestion? Swap family snaps for lush, aspirational travel images, which you can have professionally printed for pennies at your local drugstore. “I love to use travel prints to display a lifestyle to the buyer—without getting too personal,” Barronton explains.

Home Staging Hack #5: Outfit a Bathroom with Elegant White Linens Your toiletries are scattered across the counter. Your tub sports a novelty shower curtain. And your mismatched towels look like they’ve been through the wash one too many times. If this sounds like the state of your bathroom, there is a quick staging fix: After clearing some of that clutter, spruce up your washroom with fresh, all-white linens. “White towels, bath mats, and shower curtains can instantly update your bathroom,” Barronton explains. “They’ll give the room the feel of a luxury spa—without having to spend much.” You can take it one step further by creating spa-like displays. “I like to roll and stack bath towels on the tub, and hand towels near the sink,” Barronton says. “Adding an orchid, candles and special soaps can also amp up that spa feel.”

Home Staging Hack #6: Arrange Decorative Vignettes Decorative displays can lend a cozy, lived-in ambience to a house, so Barronton suggests assembling classy vignettes of colorful vases, lanterns, books, plants, baskets, and other decorative items atop dressers, counters and even bookshelves. Not sure where to start? Barronton recommends grouping items in odd numbers and varying their heights and shapes—while also keeping the pieces in the same color family. To cut costs, mix items you already own with ones you pick up at craft stores. “When well-constructed, these displays can give your home that glossy, out-of-a-magazine feel,” Barronton says. “And that really appeals to buyers.”



AMPI is the national association of real estate professionals that have, since 1956, gathered under laws and codes of ethics and conduct to create a reliable, trustworthy and efficient real estate environment in Mexico.

AMPI consists of separate autonomous sections all throughout the nation, as well as more than 4000 associates and affiliates. Each section is independent and has its own board of directors, only surpassed by a national board of directors comprised of twenty associates from all over the republic.

Developed over the years with the input and knowledge of its members, AMPI is much more than just a collection of offices. AMPI has been a solid and recognized institution in Mexico for the past 27 years. It was originally established in 1956 and was consolidated in 1980. AMPI is currently represented in all the principle cities and regions of Mexico stretching from Tijuana to Cancun.

Vallarta Real Estate: Staging a House for Sale in 2017

Staging a House for Sale in 2017: What You Need to Know
From an article we found helpful in www.advisoryhq.com:

If you watch home improvement shows on television, you’ve likely heard the term “home staging.” Although it can seem like a daunting task for homeowners who are already stressed from trying to sell their house, staging your home is an integral part of making the sale.

Imagine the homes you would consider buying. Do you prefer the ones with clutter and design very personal to a family? Or would a home feel more inviting with a more neutral design and a clean, organized space?

The homeowners of the latter have likely used staging companies or did the work themselves. And, from staging a home, these homeowners are likely to see an 8% to 10% return on investment of their staging costs, which average about 1% to 3%.

staging a house

That’s a significant difference in price that they can sell their home for, simply by staging furniture in a way that makes a home feel new to prospective buyers. Staging a home for sale creates an open palette for buyers to imagine themselves in.

But, is staging a house difficult? How much does staging a house for sale cost? Is it better to use home staging companies or do it yourself with the help of virtual staging software?

This guide will answer your questions about staging a home in 2017 and provide valuable home staging tips to make the process go as smoothly as possible for you.


Ready to Sell? Tips for Selling Your Home

When you consider selling your home, you likely get flooded with tips for selling your home from friends and family. Although some are probably good pieces of advice, others may not be necessary.

The best tips for selling your home involve tried-and-true methods that streamline the process and give you the best return on investment. In other words, tips for selling your home should get you the most money for your home with the least stress as possible.

Staging your home to sell is one of the best tips for selling your home, according to real estate blogger Teresa Mears. Staging furniture is one of the best ways to define spaces for prospective buyers so they can see themselves in the home and have a clear purpose for each space.



AMPI is the national association of real estate professionals that have, since 1956, gathered under laws and codes of ethics and conduct to create a reliable, trustworthy and efficient real estate environment in Mexico.

AMPI consists of separate autonomous sections all throughout the nation, as well as more than 4000 associates and affiliates. Each section is independent and has its own board of directors, only surpassed by a national board of directors comprised of twenty associates from all over the republic.

Developed over the years with the input and knowledge of its members, AMPI is much more than just a collection of offices. AMPI has been a solid and recognized institution in Mexico for the past 27 years. It was originally established in 1956 and was consolidated in 1980. AMPI is currently represented in all the principle cities and regions of Mexico stretching from Tijuana to Cancun.

Vallarta Real Estate: Online Directories for Global Connections

4 Online Directories Help You Find Global Connection
Even though face-to-face networking is the best way to build a global practice, it’s also important to research a market and learn more about key individuals and organizations that are actively involved in global business. To support your efforts, NAR offers four valuable online directories:

1. Cooperating Associations

www.realtor.org/intlnet.nsf/Home?OpenForm

Cooperating Associations act as like-minded partners with NAR, seeking to enhance professionalism in their country and maintaining bilateral agreements. While they are typically real estate industry groups, a Cooperating Association may also be a government organization. (Note: Ambassador Associations can also be found through this directory.)

2. President’s Liaisons

www.realtor.org/intlnet.nsf/SearchPL

These are NAR members, appointed by the president of NAR to serve as his or her liaison to real estate professionals in their designated country. President’s Liaisons are further organized into five regions and work under the direction of a Regional Coordinator (also an NAR member appointed by the president).

3. CIPS Designees

www.realtor.org/cips-search

​​​​​​​The CIPS network includes over 3,400 designees in 45 countries. These are your peers, in terms of sharing a commitment to the highest level of professionalism and education in global real estate.

4. International REALTOR® Members

www.realtor.org/findarealtor

​​​​​​​Use this directory to find real estate professionals around the world who are members of NAR and subscribe to a code of ethics similar to that of NAR.


AMPI is the national association of real estate professionals that have, since 1956, gathered under laws and codes of ethics and conduct to create a reliable, trustworthy and efficient real estate environment in Mexico.

AMPI consists of separate autonomous sections all throughout the nation, as well as more than 4000 associates and affiliates. Each section is independent and has its own board of directors, only surpassed by a national board of directors comprised of twenty associates from all over the republic.

Developed over the years with the input and knowledge of its members, AMPI is much more than just a collection of offices. AMPI has been a solid and recognized institution in Mexico for the past 27 years. It was originally established in 1956 and was consolidated in 1980. AMPI is currently represented in all the principle cities and regions of Mexico stretching from Tijuana to Cancun.

Vallarta Real Estate: Declining Peso Makes The Perfect Time To Buy

AMPI Agent, Ryan Donner, From CB Lacosta Real Estate has shared this interesting article with us:

Baron Rothschild once said that “The time to buy [real estate] is when there’s blood in the streets!” While there isn’t actually any blood in the streets of Puerto Vallarta, the decline in the Peso to the Dollar makes it the perfect time to buy.

Americans and Canadians are traveling to Puerto Vallarta in droves. GAP (Grupo Aeropuerto del Pacifico S.A.B. de C.V.) reports a 13.1% increase in total number of passengers through Aeropuerto Internacional Licenciado Gustavo Díaz Ordaz or PVR for short. There are also now more direct flights to Puerto Vallarta than there have ever been in the past. 14 Canadian cities, 20 U.S. cities and 12 Mexican cities have direct flights. More flights are continually being added and from other countries around the globe as well, such as Finland.

With the Peso around 20 to 1 (16 to 1 Canadian) it’s easy to see why people are visiting Puerto Vallarta by the masses. The dollar goes twice as far as it did two years ago.

Mexican Peso versus US Dollar over 5 years
Mexican Peso versus US Dollar over 5 years

With the increase in tourism and spending power what has this done to the real estate market?

Puerto Vallarta Real Estate Sales by Year

Since 2013 we have seen a significant amount of movement in the real estate market, but 2016 was the biggest change. 42% increase in overall property sales across the Puerto Vallarta and Nayarit regions in 2016 over 2015.

So why should you buy now?

Puerto Vallarta is in a renaissance of growth. With 12 new developments being built right now, and 3 already finished in the end of 2015 and early 2016, there is a lot of inventory on the market. This flood in inventory has forced condo prices to be very competitive. While the real estate market in Puerto Vallarta is an all-cash market, buyers are able to work with developers to pay for their condo in installments. This makes owning a brand new condo in Zona Romantica very attractive and feasible for the average buyer.

If you’ve been thinking of taking the plunge like so many Americans and Canadians do each year to buy a condo or property in Puerto Vallarta, now is the time to do so.  The Peso is bleeding in the street, it’s time to buy!



AMPI is the national association of real estate professionals that have, since 1956, gathered under laws and codes of ethics and conduct to create a reliable, trustworthy and efficient real estate environment in Mexico.

AMPI consists of separate autonomous sections all throughout the nation, as well as more than 4000 associates and affiliates. Each section is independent and has its own board of directors, only surpassed by a national board of directors comprised of twenty associates from all over the republic.

Developed over the years with the input and knowledge of its members, AMPI is much more than just a collection of offices. AMPI has been a solid and recognized institution in Mexico for the past 27 years. It was originally established in 1956 and was consolidated in 1980. AMPI is currently represented in all the principle cities and regions of Mexico stretching from Tijuana to Cancun.

Vallarta Real Estate: Top retirement destination goes to Mexico

We are all interdependent and we thought this information may prove interesting.  Article reposted from World Property Journal

According to InternationalLiving.com’s recently released 2017 Global Retirement Index, the top retirement destination in the world this year now goes to Mexico.

This annual ranking of the world’s top 24 retirement destinations is based on cost of living, retiree benefits, climate, healthcare, and more and compares, contrasts, ranks, and rates good-value havens all around the world.

Mexico offers a diverse geography, with everything from white-sand beaches to high-mountain colonial cities, which means expats have a broad choice in locales. This country’s climate ranges from moist, tropical heat to dry desert and everything in between. It is rich in casual beach towns, vibrant Spanish-colonial cities, and small country villages.

And today, with the Mexican peso at historic lows against the U.S. dollar, for people shopping with greenbacks, Mexico is more affordable than it has been in years. Expats report that it feels like Mexico is on sale.

Mexico always features among the top 10 destinations in the Index, and usually among the top five. It’s already home to more North American expats than any other country in the world. Well over a million U.S. and Canadian citizens are estimated to live in communities throughout Mexico, full- or part-time.

“Mexico really does offer a modest cost of living and a high quality of life,” says Glynna Prentice, International Living’s Mexico Editor. “A couple can live very comfortably on less than $2,000 a month, and you can understand how when healthcare costs run 25% to 50% less than those in the States, a housekeeper will clean for $5 an hour, a lunch special costs $7 for a full meal, and you can rent a two-bedroom condo a block off the beach in some communities for $575 a month.

“All those things are important. But they don’t really explain Mexico’s appeal. Life here is easy and relaxed. People are friendly and welcoming, and their warmth is genuine. Music is everywhere, and colors are somehow more vivid here, smiles brighter.”

While Mexico wins the top spot, this year’s Index ranks the top 24 retirement destinations in the world in 10 categories, including: buying and renting property; benefits and discounts; visas and residence; cost of living; fitting in; entertainment and amenities; healthcare; healthy lifestyle; infrastructure; and climate.

The key aim of the Index is to help retirees find locations where their dollar goes further– where they can get the best bang for buck in terms of real estate, cost of living, and overall quality of life.

The Index also assesses the quality of a country’s healthcare and infrastructure, the proficiency in English of the local population, and the size of existing expat communities, how healthy the lifestyle is, how easy it is to gain residence, and more.

When the scores in all 10 individual categories are added up, a total score is established for each country that yields the list of the overall best countries in the world for retirement. This year, Mexico came out on top.



AMPI is the national association of real estate professionals that have, since 1956, gathered under laws and codes of ethics and conduct to create a reliable, trustworthy and efficient real estate environment in Mexico.

AMPI consists of separate autonomous sections all throughout the nation, as well as more than 4000 associates and affiliates. Each section is independent and has its own board of directors, only surpassed by a national board of directors comprised of twenty associates from all over the republic.

Developed over the years with the input and knowledge of its members, AMPI is much more than just a collection of offices. AMPI has been a solid and recognized institution in Mexico for the past 27 years. It was originally established in 1956 and was consolidated in 1980. AMPI is currently represented in all the principle cities and regions of Mexico stretching from Tijuana to Cancun.

Vallarta Real Estate: What are the predictions for the USA Market?

We are all interdependant and we thought this information may prove interesting.  Article reposted from www.forbes.com

In so many ways 2016 was an unprecedented, volatile and, for some, excruciating 12 months. And the housing market was not immune to the year’s whims. At the start experts anticipated a pick up in building activity, instead builders are still not producing enough homes. Meanwhile, home prices appreciated beyond expectations and mortgage rates toyed with record lows before crossing 4% for the first time in two years. “If the expectation was that the market would transition smoothly from deep red hot recovery to normal–that certainly didn’t happen,” says Svenja Gudell, chief economist at real estate data firm Zillow.

Nevertheless, Gudell and others argue that on balance 2016 was a pretty good year for housing. National prices finally crossing the previous 2006 peak, mortgage rates remained historically low and there were some signs that Millennials, a generation which some feared would never buy homes, are beginning to enter the market. Through it all the election loomed large. In 2017 we’ll see how profound it’s effects.

Here are eight things housing experts expect to see in 2017:

1. Prices will continue to rise–but more slowly. 

Prices rose every month last year (through October) with the largest gains coming in the later half and a 5.61% increase in national. Experts expect prices will continue their climb, but gains will slow. “We believe price increases will hold steady despite slowing sales growth, because homebuyer demand is stronger now than it was at the same time last year, and because we foresee a small uptick in homes for sale,” notes Nela Richardson, chief economist at real estate brokerage Redfin.

“With the current high consumer confidence numbers and low unemployment rate, affordability trends do not suggest an immediate reversal in home price trends,” noted David Blitzer, chairman of the Index Committee at S&P Dow Jones Indices, in the December release of the Case-Shiller home price index. “Nevertheless, home prices cannot rise faster than incomes and inflation indefinitely.”

Redfin expects the median home sale prices to gain 5.3% in 2017 compared to 2016, which would not be a major change from the 5.5% year-over-year gain expected to close out this year. Zillow is forecasting the median home value to rise 3.2% from $192,500 between November 2016 to November 2017. Zillow’s home value index rose 6.5% in the year ending November 30th.

2. Affordability will worsen. 

Wages are expected to grow in America’s big cities this year, but the share of homes affordable to someone earning the median income is not. This trend, which has stymied many aspiring to buy their first home over the past few years, will be intensified by a continued shortage in low- to moderate-priced inventory and rising mortgage rates. “The irony of the modern housing market is that the places where we are seeing wage growth are places where people can’t live because they are too un-affordable. There is a mismatch,” says Nela Richardson, chief economist at real estate brokerage Redfin.

A decade ago a mismatch like this would not have been so apparent because buyers could get subprime loans, but now high credit is a requirement. The percent of new listings in the lowest price tier of the market has declined nearly every month in the last five years. Experts agree that even if builders are more active this year, they are unlikely to significantly add to the starter home stock in 2017.

3. Mortgage rates will be volatile. 

The two major political events of 2016 set mortgage rates moving in opposite directions. In June, the British vote to exit the European Union put rates near a record low. In November, the U.S. election of Donald Trump had the opposite effect, sending rates above 4% for the first time in two years. By historic standards rates are still low. In 2017 experts expect movement, but differ on where for the 30-year fixed rate will land. Estimates out there range from between 3.75% and 4.6%–not so far from where it is today.

“Mortgage rates going up is a bit of euphoria and optimism over [Trump’s] promise to lower taxes, increase infrastructure spending and drive 4% econ growth,” says Richardson. “As more details materialize and we get a realistic assessment, we will see rates bump around.” Notes Gudell: “If you squint at line you will see nice upward trend, but it will happen at a volatile pace.”

In December the Federal Reserve bumped short term interest rates o between 0.50% and 0.75%, the second hike in a decade. The 25 basis point move left rates low by historic standards and on did not have a huge impact on mortgage rates. However, the Fed’s policy makers indicated they anticipate three hikes in 2017, which could have a larger effect. That’s up from the two officials projected before Donald Trump was elected. That said, Fed projections can be taken with a grain of salt: they also originally thought they would hike three times in 2016.

oca-risinginterestrates-v2b4. Credit availability will improve–maybe. 

By and large early Trump administration priorities are not expected to deal directly with housing. However, the president-elect and his team have made it clear that they hope to roll back much of the post-crisis financial regulation laid out in the Dodd-Frank Act. In theory, this could open up banks to lend more freely to wide-range of would be buyers. Though not everyone is convinced this type of lending is the direction banks would go with any new found freedom. Meanwhile, there is speculation that Trump would return government-controlled mortgage companies Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to private control. Investors have cheered the possibility, but some housing economists worry such a move would further restrict who could get credit to buy a home.

5. Supply will improve but remain short. 

Declining inventory was without a doubt the defining feature of the housing market in 2016. It led to price appreciation, as well as a hyper fast market for buyers and discouraged would-be-sellers who feared entering the buying fray. A complete turnaround is unlikely in 2017, but there are some signs the coming year could see a small bump in housing supply–at least on the new home front.

Homebuilder sentiment picked up late last year, as many expect Trump to be a friend to the industry. Meanwhile, strong demand should also encourage building. “Controlling for the number of households in the U.S., housing starts are still only 55% of the 50-year average,” wrote Trulia Chief Economist Ralph McLaughlin. “The historical view looks like there’s also more room for housing starts to grow.” Construction, however, is unlikely to improve the affordability picture because there is a growing premium for new homes and most building in recent years has been on the high-end, since builders feel they can get a better return there.

When it comes to existing homes a phenomenon Richardson calls “rate lock” may constrain inventory. Homeowners who locked in a mortgage below 4% are likely to stay in low priced homes rather than upgrade, a pattern that last emerged when rates briefly rose in 2013.

6. More Millennials will become homeowners–and renters. 

According to Zillow half of all buyers are under age 36. Not every economist agrees with this assessment, however it is clear that Millennials will continue to make up a large and growing portion of the buyer pool. Of course much of this is due to the fact that Millennials–adults born after 1980–are now the largest adult generation and make up the greatest percentage of the workforce. Redfin expects Millennial homebuyers will move from the coasts to “inland markets” where starter homes are more affordable.

7. Competition will grow fiercer.

In 2017 sellers will maintain the edge over buyers as demand is expected to increase. In 2016 the typical homes stayed on the market for just 52 days, about a week faster than in 2015 and the fastest year since Redfin began measuring in 2009. The brokerage expects 2017 to be even faster.

 



AMPI is the national association of real estate professionals that have, since 1956, gathered under laws and codes of ethics and conduct to create a reliable, trustworthy and efficient real estate environment in Mexico.

AMPI consists of separate autonomous sections all throughout the nation, as well as more than 4000 associates and affiliates. Each section is independent and has its own board of directors, only surpassed by a national board of directors comprised of twenty associates from all over the republic.

Developed over the years with the input and knowledge of its members, AMPI is much more than just a collection of offices. AMPI has been a solid and recognized institution in Mexico for the past 27 years. It was originally established in 1956 and was consolidated in 1980. AMPI is currently represented in all the principle cities and regions of Mexico stretching from Tijuana to Cancun.

Vallarta Real Estate: Drones Are Changing RE Marketing

Article reposted from Winningagent.com

Drones Are Changing Real Estate Marketing

Steven, a Realtor and real estate photographer in New Jersey recently told me:

The drone stories and questions have been a hot topic lately and every story or question on the site has drawn me like a fly to light. Before I had my drone I was dismayed at the lack of response I would receive when I brought up drones. Now that I own a drone there seems to be a steady but growing small demand for drone flights. I believe that at full maturity it has financial value. More than the drone revenue, it seems to be opening doors for agents who now take notice of my services and comment, “You provide done photos?”. It will be hard to calculate the totals but it does seem like the conversation and the drone are going to grow my regular photo business.

Yes, your comments are what many others are seeing. There is a recent article at cbsnews.com entitled “9 Ways Drones Are Changing Real Estate.” Summarizing the article, the 9 ways they talk about are:

  1. Budget-friendly aerial photography
  2. Buzz for listing agents
  3. Better views of bigger homes
  4. Look at the land (large properties)
  5. A more personal view of the property
  6. Tour of the town (showing the local neighborhood)
  7. Remote viewings (future possibilities)
  8. Increasing privacy concerns
  9. Increasing liability concerns

I think you are experiencing a lot of #2. Agents are drawn to the latest marketing techniques and while drone photos are not important for all properties, for larger homes (like this one), it can have a huge impact.



AMPI is the national association of real estate professionals that have, since 1956, gathered under laws and codes of ethics and conduct to create a reliable, trustworthy and efficient real estate environment in Mexico.

AMPI consists of separate autonomous sections all throughout the nation, as well as more than 4000 associates and affiliates. Each section is independent and has its own board of directors, only surpassed by a national board of directors comprised of twenty associates from all over the republic.

Developed over the years with the input and knowledge of its members, AMPI is much more than just a collection of offices. AMPI has been a solid and recognized institution in Mexico for the past 27 years. It was originally established in 1956 and was consolidated in 1980. AMPI is currently represented in all the principle cities and regions of Mexico stretching from Tijuana to Cancun.

Vallarta Real Estate: In The Case of Divorce

Article reposted from Winningagent.com

What can you do to keep the sales process together when the family is falling apart?

Deanna and Randy were embroiled in a nasty divorce, but the one thing they did agree on was that Annette was the right Realtor to sell the family home. Deanna had walked out months before, and Randy was still living in the house. Now the financial struggle had reached its peak, and Deanna demanded that they sell the house immediately so she could have her half of the money.

Annette was caught in the crossfire. Divorce and selling a home are two of life’s most stressful events. Going through both at the same time can be ten times worse.  Annette needed to act quickly. Working with her manager, she developed a five-point strategy for keeping her sanity while completing a successful sale.

  1. Be neutral. Absolute neutrality works for Switzerland, and it will work for you. Never take sides and never try to force the warring factions to communicate with each other. For you this may mean a lot of separate and duplicate communication. However, it’s critically important that nobody has the impression that you are trying to force one person’s agenda on the other.
  1. Be attentive. Listen to understand. Your clients may vent all their frustrations on you, and they will both have plenty to vent. When someone needs to get something off their chest, just let it happen. If people can express themselves freely, then the frustration level goes down. In addition, listening actively lets you know exactly where they are coming from and lets them know that you understand. You don’t have to agree. You just have to “get it.”
  1. Be proactive. Having clear agreements about logistics is essential. Put together a checklist of boundaries and understandings that both you and the sellers agree to. This checklist would include days and times when the house is available to be shown, times when you are available by phone or text, how offers and counteroffers will be handled. Also discuss what procedure you need to follow if the two parties cannot agree.
  1. Be helpful. You may need to go the second mile, or even farther, in getting the house ready to show. Belongings need to be sorted, packed, and stored. Especially if both parties are still living in the house, this could get very touchy. There’s a lot of emotion involved in splitting possessions and selling or giving away sentimental items. You may need to do a lot of handholding through this process. In addition, you’ll need to provide some staging assistance, help clear the clutter, and provide some of the homey touches that neutralize any appearance of conflict or discord.
  1. Be flexible. In spite of your best efforts, there will be upsets and conflicts to deal with. Be sure you have open lines of communication with the attorneys for both sellers. The attorneys should provide guidance about matters such as deciding equity and how the closing should be handled. They may recommend a real estate appraiser, or ask you to provide one. And if the process reaches an impasse, you will need to communicate through the attorneys rather than communicating with the sellers.

Regardless of what caused the split, both parties have a strong emotional attachment to the home, and selling it is a source of real anguish. History and memories are being destroyed. Owning a home is the American dream, and that dream vanishes when divorce occurs. With a little planning and a lot of luck, you can help both parties move on to a new and different dream.