Hey Vallarta… Where Was Terminator Filmed?

El Eden

Paradise. South of Puerto Vallarta, up a long trek over bumpy, dusty roads and there you are, El Eden, a patch in the jungle  of true earthly delights, waterfalls, rope-swings, great guacamole, and film-buff historical material.

We have been told that several movies have been filmed in this location but only one stands out in the memory of those who follow the screen history of Arnold Schwarzenegger and his heroic exploits byway of Hollywood. Remnants of The Predator remind us that “soon the hunt will begin”, but our personal ardent search involves guacamole, chips and ice cold cerveza (beer), not alien creatures, though they are lurking.

Thrills are abundant here for young and old alike. Steps away from the comfort of your table in the restaurant are ropes dangling from the treetops. Arm strength and bravado are the only requirements to grip firmly, swing out and let go, land in the refreshing, chilly water of the Mismaloya River that runs long and cool from high above. If you choose to simply observe, find a spot where you can watch daredevils edge along the southern path to the top of an outcropping of smooth rocks, possibly made so from all the backsides that have traveled the quick course downward into the pond below. Test your mettle by sitting first at the top and let the cool water rush around you before you shove off for a delightful splash and a fabulous memory.

Mosquitoes are abundant in the jungle and El Eden is no exception. Along with swimsuits, towels and pesos, don’t forget strong bug repellent. We recommend a local pharmacy in Puerto Vallarta for a supply; don’t be afraid to ask a sales associate what works best for the area.

There are ziplines at El Eden, but they’re an added attraction and it’s wise to make reservations and pay in advance.

If you have a 4-wheel drive, the journey from the highway is easy but don’t risk the suspension of your own car trying to traverse the road to El Eden. Taxis are plentiful and willing to drive you; or you can go via a tour from Puerto Vallarta, which will be more expensive but tours are popular. To get to El Eden from Puerto Vallarta, travel about 10 kilometers south and hang a left opposite of the Barceló Puerto Vallarta Resort. A residential community climbs up the hill to the left and often the gate is left open; avoid traveling up this long and winding hill that dead ends. You will travel through the small village of Mismaloya, pass signs for the zoo and the tequila factory where you will come to a concrete road that doesn’t last long. Keep to the right until you reach the crossroads where you will bear right again and begin a climb that will end 180 meters above sea level, approximately 4 kms up river. It’s a dusty back road but well worth the time and effort.

Hours are 9 am – 6 pm.

Que cómo es es.


 Thanks to our Guest Blogger Adam Garcia for this great article!


Harriet Cochran Murray, Director of Cochran Real Estate, is a seasoned Real Estate professional both here in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico and in the United States. Harriet has served in many capacities as a board member and President for the local Real Estate Association AMPI (AMPI is the national association of real estate professionals). She is also a member of FIABCI and NAR in the United States. Harriet’s expertise and experience in the Real Estate and especially in the Mexican market makes her Viewpoint blog articles both informational and intriguing. Harriet is a Buyer’s Agent who specializes in getting the best deal on the right property for her clients.


Where to stay in Puerto Vallarta

Where Shall We Stay?

Social networking has opened up new trends in travel that create opportunities for making new friends while discovering new places, including Puerto Vallarta.

VRBO (Vacation Rental by Owner) purportedly started the movement in 1995 with the first gig in a ski condo. Since acquired by HomeAway, it is still a main source for travelers looking for short-term rental of properties by their owners and has been joined by an abundance of online rental sites.

We recently met a couple in Puerto Vallarta who is purchasing their home with the entire focus on renting out an extra room to meet their mortgage obligations. It makes sense for them and for you, too. Why spend hundreds of dollars for clean sheets and tiny soap when you can get the same thing for a whole lot less and meet the locals as a bonus?

The two most popular sites are AIRBNB and FLIPKEY, doing a healthy competition to get your attention and travel budget. AIRBNB, founded in 2008 with a diverse group of investors that includes Jeff Bezos and Ashton Kutcher, connects travelers seeking unique experiences in over 33,000 cities and 192 countries. Your choice of a villa, castle or bedroom in a private home is as far away as an app on your cell phone. You can literally rent a tent. FLIPKEY was acquired a year after startup, in 2008, by Trip Advisor, with a focus on detailed reviews from real guests. They have the only closed review system that limits comments to confirmed guests, both negative and positive, to facilitate a straightforward dialog relating to the quality of individual rentals and services provided.

CouchSurfing was established in 2003 and their motto is “You have friends all over the world, you just haven’t met them yet.” They connect over 9 million members in more than 120,000 cities, including Puerto Vallarta. The originator emailed over 1500 university students in Iceland, looking for a place to crash while he visited Reykjavík, got over 50 responses and a new idea was born. It doesn’t cost anything but you are encouraged to share your knowledge, talents or whatever you have to offer. Meditative breathing, hiking, computer programming, and cooking are among the skills members are willing to share. A great plus is their social networking announcements of events, such as the recent Classic Rock Festival that took place in Puerto Vallarta.

Que es cómo es.


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Hey Vallarta… Rainy Season Is Here

We are often asked what the climate is in Puerto Vallarta and if we are affected by hurricanes that come roaring up the Pacific coastline. The Köppen-Geiger climate classification system, considered the most reliable globally, identifies Puerto Vallarta as tropical. The categories that determine this are how close we are to the equator and plant classification. Scientifically speaking, this is a jungle with a prominent rainy season and exposure to unpredictable weather conditions.

In our experience, the period from November to June is normally very dry. Did we say normal? The past couple years we have experienced the same global climate changes as the rest of the world and torrential downpours have changed viewpoints of many tourists who planned week-long vacations from December to February, when we had measurable rain. While we feel dreadfully sorry for those whose holidays were rained out, we also are extremely grateful. The summer of 2015 has proven there can quite often be a reversal in these predictions, with a minimal amount of precipitation, overloading in early September to cause major flooding. We are inclined to lean very hard in the direction of Climate Change.

High tides also have an impact on the area and if combined with stormy weather off the coast and a substantial rainfall, can be cause for carrying an umbrella and an extra pair of flip-flops.

Puerto Vallarta is on the same latitude as Hawaii and therefore the weather is expected to be much the same but there is a large body of water between the two places where many changes take place in very short distances. Trying to determine averages has been more of a crapshoot for reliable forecasts.

The last hurricane to strike Puerto Vallarta was Kenna in October 2002 and impacted only the immediate shoreline. Warnings came a day ahead, and though many failed to take it seriously, there were no deaths and few injuries.

How to make a plan? First, remember that no matter how wet it is, it will still be warm. It seems that it’s not just the winter months anymore, so if preparing for a wedding or other major celebration that calls for a large gathering of people, make sure there is an alternate venue. Hotels have an abundance of covered spaces, indoor and outside with grand vistas of the beach and ocean. It’s always wise to pack a light jacket, sweater or shawls to cover up in the evening.

Que cómo es es.


 Thanks to our Guest Blogger Adam Garcia for this great article!


Harriet Cochran Murray, Director of Cochran Real Estate, is a seasoned Real Estate professional both here in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico and in the United States. Harriet has served in many capacities as a board member and President for the local Real Estate Association AMPI (AMPI is the national association of real estate professionals). She is also a member of FIABCI and NAR in the United States. Harriet’s expertise and experience in the Real Estate and especially in the Mexican market makes her Viewpoint blog articles both informational and intriguing. Harriet is a Buyer’s Agent who specializes in getting the best deal on the right property for her clients.


Hey Vallarta… It's Mosquito Season

This time of year, there is an abundance of conservation regarding mosquitoes in and around Puerto Vallarta. Some of us are just too delicious for our own good. We have a friend who’s tried everything under the sun (and from the pharmacy counter) but the only solution for her is to sit in front of a blasting fan, and the moskies still seem to find her. She realizes that keeping mosquitoes at bay is very important, as their stings can be more than slightly irritating and potentially detrimental to one’s health. Dengue is not something we want to contract, whether on vacation or as a full or part-time resident, no matter how lovely the local hospitals seem.

Some find that routine Vitamin B injections work to repel insects, while others claim that garlic applied to the skin is an assured repellent. Neither have any factual or scientific basis nor does the practice of eating bananas to keep the little biting buggers away. There is actually an argument about whether banana consumption is a deterrent or an attraction! You’re resigned to doing your own research on fruits and herbs, even though it’s not comforting to know one is providing constant blood transfusions to creatures that promise to buzz in one’s ear all night like a mini chainsaw.

Locals are known in the summer months to lather their bodies in an olive oil/garlic/lemon/coconut oil mixture, which the insects simply drown or suffocate.

We recommend Baygon plug-ins and raidolitos, the spiraling incense, both available in supermarkets and drugstores. They are proven repellents and though contain a certain amount of chemicals, are the most effective. After decades of experimenting with natural products, we have capitulated to using most costly yet effective solutions.

It’s highly recommended that visitors spray ankles when venturing to the beach for sunset vistas. It’s a particularly opportunistic time for feasting in the bloodsucking realm. There are many brands and varieties with and without DEET and once again, we are inclined to use the strongest repellant offered and recommend whatever the locals buy over the counter, Autan in the lotion application being our favorite.

We’re luckier here in Puerto Vallarta than neighbors further up the coast. In San Blas, for example, the jejéne is quite famous. Also referred to as a no-see-um, they do exist in Puerto Vallarta but not in the abundance as northern regions. There is a prevailing legend regarding the torture of captured prisoners. In an effort to obtain a confession, suspects were stripped naked and staked on the beach at sunset. It wasn’t long before the begging for mercy began and desired confession was achieved.

Que es cómo es.


 Thanks to our Guest Blogger Adam Garcia for this great article!


Harriet Cochran Murray, Director of Cochran Real Estate, is a seasoned Real Estate professional both here in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico and in the United States. Harriet has served in many capacities as a board member and President for the local Real Estate Association AMPI (AMPI is the national association of real estate professionals). She is also a member of FIABCI and NAR in the United States. Harriet’s expertise and experience in the Real Estate and especially in the Mexican market makes her Viewpoint blog articles both informational and intriguing. Harriet is a Buyer’s Agent who specializes in getting the best deal on the right property for her clients.


It is the age of the hero In Puerto Vallarta

Grab Your Cape!

Sometimes we do become bored in Puerto Vallarta, believe it or not. Sipping margaritas on the beach, ziplining through the jungle, diving off the Marietas; at times we seek diversion. It is the age of the hero, with Marvel Comic Book characters on movie screens, beach towels and t-shirts; they give us inspiration.

Volunteering in Puerto Vallarta could actually be a full time occupation. There is no shortage of need. Animal rescue is huge here and it is easy to start a conversation in any bar or venue about the abundance of cats and dogs. There is the Acopio, a  city-owned shelter where help is always welcome; walking dogs, bathing, grooming. The cat shelter, Purr Project is also looking for fur-friends to assist with simple veterinary needs and giving attention to their large cast of felines. Both require very little knowledge; just the willingness to pitch in. Neuter and spay clinics are always willing to teach visitors and residents alike about their efforts to keep the population down and invite anyone who wants to join the cause. It’s fascinating and educational. Fostering animals is always appreciated, too. Many are up for adoption or have already been chosen and awaiting flight to their future homes.

Orphanages never run out of things when company come calling. They love donations but make sure you’re bringing only gently used clothing when donating, and check with them first about food wishes. Puerto Vallarta has orphanages associated with churches for the most part and it’s good to have a connection when planning to pay a visit.

Pasito de Luz in Puerto Vallarta is a daycare center for children with special needs. They appreciate anyone who has experience but it’s not necessary. Mexican families drop their children off in the morning at this great facility where they can stay for a short time or several hours. Spanish isn’t necessary; all that’s required is an outpouring of love.

Tutors are a special breed of people and schools welcome those with skills who are able to assist students. Spanish isn’t always a requirement either, since the schools are bi-lingual. Check with the individual institutions and if you’re truly ambitious, post your services on one of the many Puerto Vallarta Facebook sites.

Turtle farms in and around Puerto Vallarta love to share their projects and there are never too many hands during migration time. Check Google for the most recent opportunities and we have found that simply talking to people in shops and bars is a great way to find out about prospects for volunteering and it’s a good way to meet new friends, too!

Que es cómo es.


 Thanks to our Guest Blogger Adam Garcia for this great article!


Vallarta Real Estate: In The Case of Divorce

Article reposted from Winningagent.com

What can you do to keep the sales process together when the family is falling apart?

Deanna and Randy were embroiled in a nasty divorce, but the one thing they did agree on was that Annette was the right Realtor to sell the family home. Deanna had walked out months before, and Randy was still living in the house. Now the financial struggle had reached its peak, and Deanna demanded that they sell the house immediately so she could have her half of the money.

Annette was caught in the crossfire. Divorce and selling a home are two of life’s most stressful events. Going through both at the same time can be ten times worse.  Annette needed to act quickly. Working with her manager, she developed a five-point strategy for keeping her sanity while completing a successful sale.

  1. Be neutral. Absolute neutrality works for Switzerland, and it will work for you. Never take sides and never try to force the warring factions to communicate with each other. For you this may mean a lot of separate and duplicate communication. However, it’s critically important that nobody has the impression that you are trying to force one person’s agenda on the other.
  1. Be attentive. Listen to understand. Your clients may vent all their frustrations on you, and they will both have plenty to vent. When someone needs to get something off their chest, just let it happen. If people can express themselves freely, then the frustration level goes down. In addition, listening actively lets you know exactly where they are coming from and lets them know that you understand. You don’t have to agree. You just have to “get it.”
  1. Be proactive. Having clear agreements about logistics is essential. Put together a checklist of boundaries and understandings that both you and the sellers agree to. This checklist would include days and times when the house is available to be shown, times when you are available by phone or text, how offers and counteroffers will be handled. Also discuss what procedure you need to follow if the two parties cannot agree.
  1. Be helpful. You may need to go the second mile, or even farther, in getting the house ready to show. Belongings need to be sorted, packed, and stored. Especially if both parties are still living in the house, this could get very touchy. There’s a lot of emotion involved in splitting possessions and selling or giving away sentimental items. You may need to do a lot of handholding through this process. In addition, you’ll need to provide some staging assistance, help clear the clutter, and provide some of the homey touches that neutralize any appearance of conflict or discord.
  1. Be flexible. In spite of your best efforts, there will be upsets and conflicts to deal with. Be sure you have open lines of communication with the attorneys for both sellers. The attorneys should provide guidance about matters such as deciding equity and how the closing should be handled. They may recommend a real estate appraiser, or ask you to provide one. And if the process reaches an impasse, you will need to communicate through the attorneys rather than communicating with the sellers.

Regardless of what caused the split, both parties have a strong emotional attachment to the home, and selling it is a source of real anguish. History and memories are being destroyed. Owning a home is the American dream, and that dream vanishes when divorce occurs. With a little planning and a lot of luck, you can help both parties move on to a new and different dream.


Hey Vallarta… What Is La Catrina?

Death is the great neutralizer. No matter whom we are or what we possess, we are all going in the same direction and headed for one particular place. Nowhere in the world celebrates the end of life quite like Mexico, including Puerto Vallarta.

The Mexican Revolution gave birth to La Catrina in the late nineteenth century, created by a talented engraver Jose Guadalupe Posada when he satirized the government, the governing, and the ruling class. The original name for La Catrina was actually La Calavera Garbancera, a name that the working class and poor used to refer to Mexicans who held their native heritage in contempt and made every attempt to pass as Europeans. The skeletal resemblance came from the propensity to wear very pale makeup, in an effort to whiten the skin. With Mictecacihuatl, the goddess of death of the underworld as his muse, Posada came up with what we know today as the current image of La Catrina.

Mictecacihuatl is the keeper of bones in the underworld; the ancient overseer of Aztec fiestas. In modern times, these celebrations have become intertwined with All Saints’ Day and other adopted ceremony of the Catholic Church.

Posada’s creation was the simple headshot with an ornate aristocratic French hat. Credit for changing her name is given to Diego Rivera, who took the hat-adorned head of Garbancera and gave her a full body, completely dressed in elegant clothing. Her debut can be seen today in Mexico City on the preserved mural Sueño de una tarde dominical en la Alameda Central (“Dream of a Sunday Afternoon in Alameda Park”) at the Museo Mural Diego Rivera. This revered display of Rivera’s art is laden with much symbolism, innuendo and legend. Trips to Mexico City can be arranged by your choice of travel agents in Puerto Vallarta.

La Catrina has always represented the disparity between the classes of Mexico and as much as there are those who claim things have changed, the reverence to this symbol only succeeds to point out how things have truly remained the same. Before the revolution, the rich enjoyed many privileges completely unavailable to those with less money. Though there is much more visibility of the lower classes in current times, poverty is still a huge political issue and daily wages remain at amazingly low levels.

Given that, the imagery of Mexico and her celebrations is a testament to the differences between borders. Though citizens of the USA see death as something to be feared and avoided, Mexicans are able to maintain a sense of humor regarding death. They remember their loved ones who’ve passed on with total awareness and spend hard earned money on gifts for the dead. They couldn’t care less who takes offense.

Que es cómo es


 Thanks to our Guest Blogger Adam Garcia for this great article!


Harriet Cochran Murray, Director of Cochran Real Estate, is a seasoned Real Estate professional both here in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico and in the United States. Harriet has served in many capacities as a board member and President for the local Real Estate Association AMPI (AMPI is the national association of real estate professionals). She is also a member of FIABCI and NAR in the United States. Harriet’s expertise and experience in the Real Estate and especially in the Mexican market makes her Viewpoint blog articles both informational and intriguing. Harriet is a Buyer’s Agent who specializes in getting the best deal on the right property for her clients.


Can Dogs Fly To Puerto Vallarta

Yes! And cats can, too! We are, of course, referring to traveling with Fido and Fifi, though it would be fun to see them turning them into Super-Pets and we know they are all Earth Angels. Questions about flying on planes with pets abound; we will address some of them here.

The most important thing you’ll need to cart your pet back and forth across the Mexico/USA border is an International Certificate of Good Health that has been signed by a certified veterinarian. You will also need Proof of Vaccination and quite often this information is located somewhere on this document or it may be a separate piece of paper. Dogs visiting Puerto Vallarta will need rabies and distemper shots and cats require only rabies but it is imperative one checks the timing against the travel date.

We have been asked about pigs, chickens, ferrets and rabbits. Not everyone finds canines and felines as appealing companions and we do like to celebrate the differences. However, bringing unusual pets into Mexico can be a sticky situation at best and sometimes completely prohibitive. The place to check is the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service website. To take a chance with our precious friends is foolish; one security guard might be willing to turn an eye but we always assume we will find ourselves under the scrutiny of the fickle inspector. Birds, of any type, must be examined, approved and documented.

Proper crates are necessary and if one’s pet is small enough to fit under the forward seat, a soft container will be required, something that can be brought into the passenger cabin. Few airlines will allow animals to be transported in cargo during the summer months for fear of suffocation in the heat so checking with one’s airline before booking is highly recommended. Bowls for water and food must be provided, regardless of the length of the journey.

Veterinarians are plentiful and extremely reasonable in Puerto Vallarta. Pets, being extended family members, should be afforded the same luxury of a restful and pleasant vacation, as much as their human counterparts. Traveling, however, with small puppies and kittens, babies of any species, should be measured with a certain

degree of caution and care. Any pet that appears to be under the age of three months will not be allowed into the country, nor will it be of proper age to have received its vaccinations.

Bringing cats and dogs back to the US and Canada is relatively simple, following the above instructions, in reverse. Many local organizations are helpful and willing to assist in adoption procedures, as well as advising on proper steps for travel. The SPCA PV in Puerto Vallarta is well known and respected for their efforts to maintain population control and quality of life for local mascots.

Que es cómo es.

 

 


 Thanks to our Guest Blogger Adam Garcia for this great article!


Harriet Cochran Murray, Director of Cochran Real Estate, is a seasoned Real Estate professional both here in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico and in the United States. Harriet has served in many capacities as a board member and President for the local Real Estate Association AMPI (AMPI is the national association of real estate professionals). She is also a member of FIABCI and NAR in the United States. Harriet’s expertise and experience in the Real Estate and especially in the Mexican market makes her Viewpoint blog articles both informational and intriguing. Harriet is a Buyer’s Agent who specializes in getting the best deal on the right property for her clients.


957 matches found

$699,000
781 Carr. Barra de Navidad 109, Paramount Bay, Puerto Vallarta, JA
View Photos (35)
# of Bedrooms: 3
# of Bathrooms: 3
Square Footage: 2677.84
Area: South Shore
Listing Agent: Michael Holland
Agent Phone: 949-302-4911
Agent Email: info@PuertoVallartaVillas.com
Last Updated: November - 20 - 2019
IDX
$145,000
S/N Av.Paraiso/Paseo de las garzas B2104, Taheima, Riviera Nayarit, NA
View Photos (21)
# of Bedrooms: 1
# of Bathrooms: 1
Square Footage: 951.51
Area: Nuevo Vallarta West
Listing Agent: Nora Diaz
Agent Email: nora@domusvallarta.com
Last Updated: November - 19 - 2019
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$255,908
193 Insurgentes 407, Avida, Puerto Vallarta, JA
View Photos (30)
# of Bedrooms: 1
# of Bathrooms: 2
Square Footage: 987.23
Area: Centro South
Listing Agent: Pedro Robin
Agent Phone: 322-172-0023
Agent Email: pedro@applegaterealtors.com
Last Updated: November - 19 - 2019
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$359,522
193 Insurgentes 710, Avida, Puerto Vallarta, JA
View Photos (32)
# of Bedrooms: 1
# of Bathrooms: 2
Square Footage: 1003.8
Area: Centro South
Listing Agent: Pedro Robin
Agent Phone: 322-172-0023
Agent Email: pedro@applegaterealtors.com
Last Updated: November - 19 - 2019
IDX
$253,953
193 Insurgentes 408, Avida, Puerto Vallarta, JA
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# of Bedrooms: 1
# of Bathrooms: 2
Square Footage: 990.46
Area: Centro South
Listing Agent: Pedro Robin
Agent Phone: 322-172-0023
Agent Email: pedro@applegaterealtors.com
Last Updated: November - 19 - 2019
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$206,803
171 Febronio Uribe 171 1009, Harbor 171, Puerto Vallarta, JA
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# of Bedrooms: 1
# of Bathrooms: 1
Square Footage: 682.83
Area: Hotel Zone
Listing Agent: Ivan Koloffon
Agent Phone: 322-131-7124
Agent Email: ivan@domusvallarta.com
Last Updated: November - 19 - 2019
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$450,000
140 Paseo de las Garzas 1-2702, ICON 1-2702, Puerto Vallarta, JA
View Photos (19)
# of Bedrooms: 2
# of Bathrooms: 2
Square Footage: 1517.16
Area: Hotel Zone
Listing Agent: Sarah Elengorn
Agent Phone: 322-116-9730
Agent Email: sarah@elengornrealtors.com
Last Updated: November - 19 - 2019
IDX
$203,552
171 Febronio Uribe 171 11008-A, Harbor 171, Puerto Vallarta, JA
View Photos (6)
# of Bathrooms: 1
Square Footage: 658.3
Area: Hotel Zone
Listing Agent: Ivan Koloffon
Agent Phone: 322-131-7124
Agent Email: ivan@domusvallarta.com
Last Updated: November - 19 - 2019
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$413,964
171 Febronio Uribe 171 8005, Harbor 171, Puerto Vallarta, JA
View Photos (49)
# of Bedrooms: 2
# of Bathrooms: 2
Square Footage: 1580
Area: Hotel Zone
Listing Agent: Ivan Koloffon
Agent Phone: 322-131-7124
Agent Email: ivan@domusvallarta.com
Last Updated: November - 19 - 2019
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$65,000
556 16 de Septiembre 6, Fracc Alboli I, Puerto Vallarta, JA
View Photos (14)
# of Bedrooms: 2
# of Bathrooms: 1
Square Footage: 745.78
Area: Pitillal South
Listing Agent: Ramona Quinn Lizárraga
Agent Phone: 322-889-1509
Agent Email: ramona_quinn@coldwellbanker.com.mx
Last Updated: November - 19 - 2019
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Vallarta Real Estate: Whats Banda?

Banda!

We love this style of music, which we first discovered years ago at a rodeo in Sayulita on our first visit to Puerto Vallarta. Some may find it brash and loud but, to us it represents joy, liveliness and people having a darn good time. Wind and brass in large and small combinations make up the banda groups we have seen in Puerto Vallarta. Bandas are hard to pin down when it comes to a designated style. They play everything; rancheras, corridos, cumbias, boleros and baladas. What are those you might ask?

Ranchera is pre-revolutionary; songs from the ranch or plantation. Ranchera is the closest thing to mariachi, which we hear in Puerto Vallarta and all about Jalisco, but mariachi came after the revolution. Ranchera, also referred to as Norteños (indicating from the north) involved songs of love, nature and patriotism. You’ll find dancers performing polkas, waltzes and boleros to this music.

Corridos express oppression and history, current topics with social relevance and the past. They are ballads and they tell a story. This type of music crosses the border because it comes from a time when there was no border. Marty Robbins famous song El Paso would be a good example of a corrido; though it’s a song from the USA, it is truly a Mexican piece. In the 1960’s corridos were very instrumental in calling the charge for farm-workers in California by Luis Valdez, who led Teatro Campesino, the production of theater art that encourages activism, economic independence, and artistic excellence.

Cumbia is basically a courtship dance that drifted north from Colombia in South America and was adapted into Banda music, fit for singing, dancing and male/female duets. It is not unusual to hear this type of music in Puerto Vallarta at folklore festivals and assemblies, accompanied by colorful traditional costumes.

Bolero is actually a dance; the music played for it is very specific and originated in Spain, migrated to Puerto Vallarta over many years, have its inception in Cuba. The music and dance are slow, very romantic, and seductive.

Baladas are narratives stories and poetry set to music and can be found in every country all over the world. Ballads you will hear from Banda in Puerto Vallarta are often late at night, toward the end of the party, and given to lengthy descriptions. It’s a great way to practice your Spanish and decipher what desperado has fallen for another beautiful señorita.

Que es cómo es.



AMPI is the national association of real estate professionals that have, since 1956, gathered under laws and codes of ethics and conduct to create a reliable, trustworthy and efficient real estate environment in Mexico.

AMPI consists of separate autonomous sections all throughout the nation, as well as more than 4000 associates and affiliates. Each section is independent and has its own board of directors, only surpassed by a national board of directors comprised of twenty associates from all over the republic.

Developed over the years with the input and knowledge of its members, AMPI is much more than just a collection of offices. AMPI has been a solid and recognized institution in Mexico for the past 27 years. It was originally established in 1956 and was consolidated in 1980. AMPI is currently represented in all the principle cities and regions of Mexico stretching from Tijuana to Cancun.