Vallarta Culture: Only People Who Live At The Beach Know

For most people the beach is somewhere to go on vacation, or for an occasional day out. The idea of living there might seem like a dream, but what is it really like for those who live right there and can see it every day? Here are 18 things that can only be fully understood by those who live by the beach.

1. You understand that the beach isn’t just for summer

Wrapping up warm and walking on a deserted beach in winter is a uniquely invigorating experience.

2. You always feel a little bit smug

After all, you get to live somewhere that people yearn to visit all year.

3. You’ve discovered that solutions to most problems can be found by sitting on the beach and staring out over the water

Similarly, if you’re in need of some inspiration, you will find it by digging your toes in the sand.

4. You take it personally when people leave trash at the beach

You wouldn’t leave trash in their backyards, so why do they leave it on your beach?

5. You always have something to do when you live near the beach

Even if it’s just sitting on the beach which is a perfectly valid way to spend time, unlike anywhere else when just sitting and doing nothing is clearly a waste of time.

6. You know that any food tastes better when eaten sitting on the sand

Even better if it’s been prepared on the beach. You’ve perfected the art of preparing and eating food on the beach without ingesting gritty sand, this is a skill to be envied by the casual beach visitor.

7. You never get bored of the view

Especially the sunsets. And the sunrises. And during the midday sun.

8. You’ve accepted that your house will never be completely sand-free

Ditto your car, clothes, hair, and pets.

9. You can instantly categorize visitors into beach “types” just by looking at them

This categorization enables you to predict their behavior on the beach, providing you with hours of entertainment as you watch and nod knowingly.

10. You hope you never lose the childlike awe of the beach

The delight in finding and collecting pretty shells, or coming across small sea creatures in little pools of water, is not reserved for children or occasional visitors.

11. You know that there is no sound in the world better than the lapping of waves on the beach

And no smell better than the salty sea air.

12. You’re constantly torn about your feelings towards tourists

You understand that they are essential for the economy of the area, and you love to see them arrive, but you wish they could be less intrusive in your beach paradise. You aim to be friendly and welcoming to them, but wish at times they showed more consideration for their surroundings and the local residents when they visit.

13. Your wardrobe is 80% beach wear

In the summer you can easily forget that other types of clothes exist.

14. You respect the power of the ocean

You’ve seen it at its calmest best and at its roughest worst, and understand the need to always respect it.

15. You get defensive if anyone compares your beach unfavorably to other beaches

They clearly haven’t understood your beach, and this situation must be rectified immediately.

16. You mistakenly think you’ve seen it all

However long you’ve lived near the beach, and however many things you’ve seen there, every year when the visitors arrive you will be surprised by new things they do, wear, and say.

17. You can’t understand anyone who says they don’t like the beach

They might as well say they don’t like breathing.

18. You can’t imagine living anywhere else

You may leave for a while, but you’ll be back. They always come back.


Mexico is moving in the right direction, working to raise the real estate standards to protect buyer and seller interests. AMPI (our National Real Estate Association) plays a key role in the real estate industry in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, working closely with local, state and national governments. Our local AMPI Association is leading the country in developing and implementing real estate standards.  To become members of our local AMPI Association Real Estate professionals sign our Bylaws that require our members to follow our Ethical Code of Conduct;  to use our contract forms which have been legally vetted to protect buyers and sellers; to participate in and comply with our MLS Rules and Regulation along with using the shared database. Our Bylaws, Code of Ethics, MLS Systems, Contracts and our other systems are constantly improved on through the expertise and experience of our members.  Find a Committed AMPI Professional Here

Vallarta Culture: Shopping

Puerto Vallarta, Mexico – In years past, shopping in Puerto Vallarta was an adventure that took us all over town, beginning in the early morning, extending through the afternoon as we made several stops. We traveled in style in our roomy combi (VW mini-bus), which had a side door that refused to close properly. No problem; we simply found someone to watch the combi and paid a security fee of ten pesos. These guards usually were denizens of the neighborhood, well on in age and knew everyone in town.

Customarily, our first stop was always Don Chuy on Aquiles Serdán across from the Rio Cuale. A well-stocked liquor store, Don Chuy supplied us with bottles of tequila, rum, vodka, gin, triple sec and Grand Marnier for our margaritas. Now we find those supplies at Vinos América on Basilio Badillo. Super la Playa is also a good place to purchase liquor, and there are often great sales at the grocery stores.

For wine, we often head over to Cork and Bottle at Los Mercados on the west end of Aquiles Serdán. Discounts for cases and chilled wine are a specialty. While we’re there we stop in at Don Fresco to check out prices on produce and perhaps pick up spices and grains we can’t find elsewhere. Mikey’s, in the same location, offers wonderful sliced meats, deli items and will whip up a delicious sandwich to sustain us during our journey.

The famed, now closed, and sorely missed, Rizo sits empty and forlorn. Though constant rumors tell of corporate takeover and a Soriana or the like in the south end, our understanding is the streets are prohibitive from allowing the large supply trucks.

Ground coffee and whole beans were once nearly impossible to find in Puerto Vallarta. Now we fulfill this need with several great competitors, including K’Rico, also located in Los Mercados. Coffee from The Hacienda Jalisco is another one of our favorites, when it is available.

We still buy fresh fish daily off the pangas (boats). Fishermen come in about noon until around 4 pm, often dropping their daily catch in contracted restaurants. If bargaining on the beach is not your cup of tea, there are wonderful pescaderias; our preferences are in the mercado at Palmar de Aramara, the fish vendor next to the Rosita Hotel on the Malecón, and in the south end on Calle Constitución, across from where we used to shop at Rizo. Shrimp is seldom local and usually comes to town frozen from places like San Blas and Mazatlán.

For everything from ham and bacon to custom-cut beef and pork, meat is still the best quality and bargain in Puerto Vallarta at Carnicería Colin on Venustiano Carranza. Be sure to ask what is fresh for the day; you might get the chance to barbeque goat!

Some prefer the convenience of the big grocery stores like Soriana and Mega, while others love the convenience of running into an OXXO, or even Farmacía Guadalajara, both of which supply most daily needs. For an adventure, however, we recommend the old fashioned style of shopping… but don’t forget to bring your own bags.


 Thanks to our Guest Blogger Adam Garcia for this great article!


Mexico is moving in the right direction, working to raise the real estate standards to protect buyer and seller interests. AMPI (our National Real Estate Association) plays a key role in the real estate industry in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, working closely with local, state and national governments. Our local AMPI Association is leading the country in developing and implementing real estate standards.  To become members of our local AMPI Association Real Estate professionals sign our Bylaws that require our members to follow our Ethical Code of Conduct;  to use our contract forms which have been legally vetted to protect buyers and sellers; to participate in and comply with our MLS Rules and Regulation along with using the shared database. Our Bylaws, Code of Ethics, MLS Systems, Contracts and our other systems are constantly improved on through the expertise and experience of our members.  Find a Committed AMPI Professional Here

Real Estate Buyer Confidence Makes Big Leap Forward in Mexico

Real estate buyer confidence makes a big leap forward in Mexico and professionalism takes center stage for many realtors during 2016. This means buyers will be able to become new property owners without hassles or hesitation.

AMPI, the Mexican Association of Real Estate Professionals, continues to push for real estate license requirements. The board wants to be sure that everyone selling real estate meets their business standards. Mexico has had almost no regulations on who can act as a real estate agent. Now AMPI is taking their profession to the next level because foreign buyers expect it.

“You have to remain vigilant when dealing with various property agents,” says Edward Padalinski, AMPI officer, “I review all local listings for MLS (Multiple Listing Service) to make sure agents are complying with AMPI rules and regulations.”

Edward serves as part of the MLS Service Committee. He is always evaluating properties and checking to make sure things like tax identification numbers are current and that nothing gets put into MLS without the proper paperwork. “This type of oversight is a great thing for the industry,” says Edward, “It gives buyers assurance in a very competitive market. AMPI also provides training for its members, so there’s a great system of checks and balances.” Edward also teach the computer software, FLEX, classes.

Although the government has been slow to respond with real estate licensing requirements, AMPI has taken a leading role by offering courses and certificates, and even collaborating with government agencies to offer a professional university degree in Mexico real estate. The AMPI board has been pushing for real estate license requirements in all states and may be well on the way to getting at least half the Mexican states to comply during 2016.

Mexico has long been overlooked as a retirement haven, but with proper promotion and integrity many will find that they can retire in luxury without spending a fortune. Over the past decade the number of buyers new to Mexican real estate and Mexico as a retirement destination, has been increasing drastically. There are about one million retirees from the US living in Mexico full or part time.

For real estate buyers, this points to a greater degree of confidence in the Mexico real estate system. By providing international standards of professionalism and service, it means that it will be easier for buyers to find the leading professionals to represent them. Buyers from the USA, Canada and Europe  should look forward to making plans to retire, buy a vacation or a rental property in Mexico safely.


Mexico is moving in the right direction, working to raise the real estate standards to protect buyer and seller interests. AMPI (our National Real Estate Association) plays a key role in the real estate industry in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, working closely with local, state and national governments. Our local AMPI Association is leading the country in developing and implementing real estate standards.  To become members of our local AMPI Association Real Estate professionals sign our Bylaws that require our members to follow our Ethical Code of Conduct;  to use our contract forms which have been legally vetted to protect buyers and sellers; to participate in and comply with our MLS Rules and Regulation along with using the shared database. Our Bylaws, Code of Ethics, MLS Systems, Contracts and our other systems are constantly improved on through the expertise and experience of our members.  Find a Committed AMPI Professional Here

Vallarta Real Estate: Taller OPC

The Office of Cultural Projects – OPC

We are very lucky to have the Ofincia de Proyectos Culturales here in Puerto Vallarta. This organization is only three years old and yet has made a considerable impact in the community. Located at 598 Juarez Street, two short blocks in El Centro off the Malecón, OPC embraces all types of art and expression. Puerto Vallarta has welcomed the discourse brought about by OPC with hearty approval. Contributors include architects, educators, curators, writers and artists of all mediums, the focus being local and global.

In the past three years the OPC has graced Puerto Vallarta with an impressive number of events. Their exhibitions have been extremely successful and well attended; they have presented instructive and enlightening workshops for local children and hosted informative music and literary affairs. This year, they opened their garden to the public for music and literary evens; it is truly a delightful spot to spend an afternoon or evening learning about the culture of Puerto Vallarta. Since their opening in 2014, OPC has presented twelve successful exhibitions, presented numerous lectures, educational experiences and participated in many events in Puerto Vallarta. Several local groups have united in the effort to lead Puerto Vallarta in keeping this enrichment going, including but not limited to Taller Pulpo Rojo, Colectivo Guerrero, Bodega Tres San Pancho and the Asociación Civil Pro-Museo. We encourage our readers to participate and learn more about these civically responsible groups. They all welcome inquisitive faces.

Crowdfunding is a great source for non-profit independent organizations such as OPC to raise the money for improvements and further developments. Private contributions have also made it possible for expansions and construction, which we are anxious to observe the commencement of, hopefully this year. They are currently in need of about $2000 USD and appreciate any small effort.

We highly recommend a visit to the Juarez location; stop in and say hello, see the unique ideas at work, enjoy the latest exhibition and lend a helping hand if you are able.

The Taller OPC, which will be a multifunctional space promises to be a community effort that Puerto Vallarta can be incredibly proud.

Que es cómo es.



AMPI is the national association of real estate professionals that have, since 1956, gathered under laws and codes of ethics and conduct to create a reliable, trustworthy and efficient real estate environment in Mexico.

AMPI consists of separate autonomous sections all throughout the nation, as well as more than 4000 associates and affiliates. Each section is independent and has its own board of directors, only surpassed by a national board of directors comprised of twenty associates from all over the republic.

Developed over the years with the input and knowledge of its members, AMPI is much more than just a collection of offices. AMPI has been a solid and recognized institution in Mexico for the past 27 years. It was originally established in 1956 and was consolidated in 1980. AMPI is currently represented in all the principle cities and regions of Mexico stretching from Tijuana to Cancun.

Hey Vallarta… What Is Amate & Cartoneria?

Aztecs were meticulous record keepers and developed their own paper long before the Spanish conquest. Amate paper was banned by the Spanish conquistadors for the simple reason it was used in Aztec religious ceremonies. It was considered by Aztec shamans to have magical properties and the Spanish weren’t interested in finding out why. However someone was smart enough to keep the secrets of amate production and not let the Spaniards completely demolish this beautiful art; it lives on today in many forms.

Amate is made from bark from the fig tree of the same name and the maguey plant, which is, among other things, also the source of tequila. For practical means and purposes, amate was replaced over the centuries by European papers, white smooth, unforgiving… but this beautiful handmade paper eventually made a huge comeback.

When it was discovered that the paintings done on amate paper could bring a fair price at bazaars and flea markets, the production of amate increased. By the mid-twentieth century, detailed and symbolic paintings, created mostly by the Nahua and Otomi indigenous people, were fetching a fair amount of revenue. Production increased and with it, artistic uses.

Amate, with other papers, including recycled newspaper, is used in the construction of cartoneria, often referred to as Mexican papier-mâché. Painted with colorful acrylics, figures take the shape of animals, clowns, imaginative and original creations, and dolls with moveable appendages. In more recent decades, La Calavera Catrina (fancy dressed up skeletons with elaborate clothing, hats, shoes, accessories) has become one of the most sought after souvenirs and though many are ceramic, less expensive ones are being molded with paper. They are light weight, easy to pack and less likely to break in transit.

Amate is also used in the production of ceremonial masks and much easier for the bearer to tote around on their head all night in what usually turn out to be lengthy parades. Piñatas made traditionally have a clay center, resulting in much difficulty to shatter when pounded with a broom handle, but layers of amate or papier-mâché bring shape and life to popular (and in some cases unpopular) characters and create themes for fiestas.

Paper is one of the original arts of Mexico. It is elaborately made, sturdily constructed and perhaps magical.

Que es cómo es.


 Thanks to our Guest Blogger Adam Garcia for this great article!


Harriet Cochran Murray, Director of Cochran Real Estate, is a seasoned Real Estate professional both here in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico and in the United States. Harriet has served in many capacities as a board member and President for the local Real Estate Association AMPI (AMPI is the national association of real estate professionals). She is also a member of FIABCI and NAR in the United States. Harriet’s expertise and experience in the Real Estate and especially in the Mexican market makes her Viewpoint blog articles both informational and intriguing. Harriet is a Buyer’s Agent who specializes in getting the best deal on the right property for her clients.


Vallarta Real Estate: Whats in Pitillal?

Check Out the New Woolworth in Pitillal!

A new Woolworth Store has opened in Pitillal and has everyone excited about bargain shopping at their favorite store that has a little bit of everything.  For serious shoppers, parking in the downtown area can be an issue. Unless you’re going to hop on a bus, which we also highly encourage, the Woolworth located in the El Centro neighborhood of Puerto Vallarta can be challenging to find a parking space close enough for large purchases.

Pitillal, which is no longer the sleepy little extension of Puerto Vallarta, now has a new Woolworth! Cinemas, Walmart and other new venues have brought changes to this colonia and everyone seems quite happy, with the exception possibly of commuters who don’t travel nearly as quickly on Calle Francisco Villa.

We remember when Pitillal was not much more than a series of unpaved roads, dozens of potholes and an fun escape from Puerto Vallarta. Now it’s a day trip, which can involve three meals, a movie and some ambitious shopping.  Without losing its sense of traditional and local culture, Pitillal, once the source of precious coconut oil production, it is now a veritable open-air shopping mall encompassed in a barrio. Buses that say Pitillal will obviously get you there or you can take a taxi.  If you’re driving yourself, take Francisco Villa, pass the library and keep going. Another route is to come from the main highway, turn inland at Walmart/Sam’s on Priscilliano Sánchez, and either way, you’ll arrive in the core of this lovely destination.

The new Woolworth is not the only reason to venture to Pitillal. We have found a variety of great shops with delightful surprises. To name a few…Ángel de Luz, where you can buy candle making materials and supplies; El Perlita, not just a buttons and bows type of merceria (sewing notions shop). At El Perlita, we have found not just craft items to peak the imagination but helpful clerks to give us ideas for new projects.   Perfumería Fraiché is a quick stop to learn how to make fragrances! Fondants is a bakery with extraordinary cakes of stunning original designs. If you’re looking for a cake for a special occasion, this is the place. El Vaquero is where you must go in search of quality cowboy boots, hats, clothing and accessories.

There are also the usual tiendas found in Puerto Vallarta (or any Mexican town, for that matter) plus fabulous restaurants and taco stands, open a variety of hours. We ‘ve discovered amazing comida corridas in Pitillal, inexpensive three and four course meals presented in small settings. Plan to spend a day; there is so much to see and do. And don’t forget about Woolworth!

Que es cómo es.



AMPI is the national association of real estate professionals that have, since 1956, gathered under laws and codes of ethics and conduct to create a reliable, trustworthy and efficient real estate environment in Mexico.

AMPI consists of separate autonomous sections all throughout the nation, as well as more than 4000 associates and affiliates. Each section is independent and has its own board of directors, only surpassed by a national board of directors comprised of twenty associates from all over the republic.

Developed over the years with the input and knowledge of its members, AMPI is much more than just a collection of offices. AMPI has been a solid and recognized institution in Mexico for the past 27 years. It was originally established in 1956 and was consolidated in 1980. AMPI is currently represented in all the principle cities and regions of Mexico stretching from Tijuana to Cancun.

Puerto Vallarta And Cilantro: Love it or not

Coriandrum satvium, more commonly known as cilantro, is one herb that people tend to love or really totally dislike. It’s one of the ingredients of Mexican salsa (known as Pico de Gallo to people from up north). In Puerto Vallarta, you won’t find a traditional restaurant that doesn’t present salsa on the table, often before you’ve even had a chance to glance at the menu.

We grow our own cilantro in one of the many pots on our sunny patio, along with basil, rosemary, thyme, parsley and other herbs we put to daily use in the kitchen. Just a few steps away… and fresh as a fish out of the sea.

Cilantro is widely used in Thai, Chinese and Eastern Indian cuisine, as well as Mexican

For those who seem to detect a soapy taste or odor, studies have proven this is the result of a genetic disorder! Aldehyde is a component of cilantro that is found in organic materials of a distinct chemical structure. If the word sounds familiar, it’s probably because it reminds one of formaldehyde, that horrible smell we recall from grade seven biology classes. Keep in mind, however, that Chanel No 5, the most popular perfume in the world, is also made with a combination of aldehydes. It’s okay if you don’t like the scent of that either. We prefer people who give off the aroma of Mexican laundry detergent but there’s a discussion for another time.

To realize the repugnance of cilantro is actually genetic makes us think there are some aversions that possibly cannot be reversed. However, it’s beneficial to take into consideration that cilantro is a natural potent antioxidant, and has a small antibacterial effect against salmonella. It’s a dietary source of magnesium, iron and manganese, is a natural diuretic and can help overcome nausea.

To make your own salsa at home you will need the following: one tomato, diced; one onion, chopped; half a fresh jalapeño or serrano pepper, seeded and finely chopped; one quarter teaspoon of salt; the juice of one medium lime; a small handful cilantro, rinsed, stemmed and coarsely chopped. Some chefs like to add one chopped cucumber or raw zucchini. Mix well and allow to chill for about an hour letting the flavors absorb one another. Serve with tortilla chips (totopos) and a pitcher of sparking lemonade or delicious margaritas. Buen provecho!

Que es cómo es.


 Thanks to our Guest Blogger Adam Garcia for this great article!


Harriet Cochran Murray, Director of Cochran Real Estate, is a seasoned Real Estate professional both here in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico and in the United States. Harriet has served in many capacities as a board member and President for the local Real Estate Association AMPI (AMPI is the national association of real estate professionals). She is also a member of FIABCI and NAR in the United States. Harriet’s expertise and experience in the Real Estate and especially in the Mexican market makes her Viewpoint blog articles both informational and intriguing. Harriet is a Buyer’s Agent who specializes in getting the best deal on the right property for her clients.


Marina Vallarta Listings!

923 matches found

$300,000
121 Paseo de la Marina 302, Nima Bay, Puerto Vallarta, JA
View Photos (19)
# of Bedrooms: 2
# of Bathrooms: 2
Square Footage: 1620.46
Area: Marina
Listing Agent: Ignacio Benitez
Agent Phone: 322-150-6881
Agent Email: ignacio@greenrealtymexico.com
Last Updated: September - 20 - 2019
$675,680
35 montessori 1202, zoho skies T3, Puerto Vallarta, JA
View Photos (35)
# of Bedrooms: 3
# of Bathrooms: 3
Square Footage: 3105.44
Area: Hotel Zone
Listing Agent: Ivan Osuna
Agent Phone: 322-150-5900
Agent Email: osuna@maromma.com
Last Updated: September - 20 - 2019
$675,680
35 montessori 1201, zoho skies T3, Puerto Vallarta, JA
View Photos (35)
# of Bedrooms: 2
# of Bathrooms: 2
Square Footage: 3105.44
Area: Hotel Zone
Listing Agent: Ivan Osuna
Agent Phone: 322-150-5900
Agent Email: osuna@maromma.com
Last Updated: September - 20 - 2019
$342,000
35 montessori 1001, zoho skies T3, Puerto Vallarta, JA
View Photos (36)
# of Bedrooms: 2
# of Bathrooms: 2
Square Footage: 1515.44
Area: Hotel Zone
Listing Agent: Ivan Osuna
Agent Phone: 322-150-5900
Agent Email: osuna@maromma.com
Last Updated: September - 20 - 2019
$325,000
35 Maria Montesori 1104, Zoho Skies, Puerto Vallarta, JA
View Photos (39)
# of Bedrooms: 2
# of Bathrooms: 2
Square Footage: 1509.31
Area: Hotel Zone
Listing Agent: Ivan Osuna
Agent Phone: 322-150-5900
Agent Email: osuna@maromma.com
Last Updated: September - 20 - 2019
$209,000
Aria Ocean 110
View Photos (15)
# of Bedrooms: 1
# of Bathrooms: 2
Square Footage: 967.65
Area: Flamingos
Listing Agent: Marcela Virgen Bernal
Agent Phone: 331-406-2361
Agent Email: marcela@pacificcoastmexico.com
Last Updated: September - 20 - 2019
$262,500
35 montessori 1106, zoho skies T3, Puerto Vallarta, JA
View Photos (37)
# of Bedrooms: 2
# of Bathrooms: 2
Square Footage: 1515.44
Area: Hotel Zone
Listing Agent: Ivan Osuna
Agent Phone: 322-150-5900
Agent Email: osuna@maromma.com
Last Updated: September - 20 - 2019
$159,000
KM 8.5 Carretera a Barra de Navidad 202, GIRASOL SUR, Puerto Vallarta, JA
View Photos (31)
# of Bathrooms: 1
Square Footage: 489.58
Area: South Shore
Listing Agent: David Hoffman
Agent Phone: 322-888-0791
Agent Email: davidh@tropicasa.com
Last Updated: September - 20 - 2019
$262,500
35 montessori 1104, zoho skies T3, Puerto Vallarta, JA
View Photos (37)
# of Bedrooms: 2
# of Bathrooms: 2
Square Footage: 1515.44
Area: Hotel Zone
Listing Agent: Ivan Osuna
Agent Phone: 322-150-5900
Agent Email: osuna@maromma.com
Last Updated: September - 20 - 2019
$255,000
35 montessori 1006, zoho skies T3, Puerto Vallarta, JA
View Photos (36)
# of Bedrooms: 2
# of Bathrooms: 2
Square Footage: 1515.44
Area: Hotel Zone
Listing Agent: Ivan Osuna
Agent Phone: 322-150-5900
Agent Email: osuna@maromma.com
Last Updated: September - 20 - 2019

1 2 3 4 5 6 ... 93
All information is deemed reliable but not guaranteed. The listings on this site are displayed courtesy of the IDX program of AMPI Vallarta Nayarit MLS and may not be the listings of the site owner.

Vallarta Culture: Covering Up

Amazingly, we see tourists in Puerto Vallarta in grocery stores and shopping malls wandering around in bikinis! Aside from being cold, some are simply not easy on the eye. We can say the same thing about fellows walking down streets (that are not located on or even near the beach) wearing those teeny tiny revealing swimsuits. Leaving nothing to the imagination is not a normal Mexican practice,Mexican men may pull up their t-shirt on very hot days, exposing their tummies (certainly not attractive, and slightly offensive) but they will not go around the streets shirtless. The beach boys, surfers and fishermen wear shirts and would never dream of parading around in a speedo.Mexicans take service very seriously and, unless one is in a fine dining establishment, it is unlikely they would ask someone to cover up, but they aren’t amused and will have some trouble communicating with a skimpily dressed customer.

Mexico is primarily a Catholic country. Until recently, women wouldn’t go into a church without a head covering and older ladies still insist on wearing a mantilla on their head. They will openly stare in disdain at young ladies who have no modesty.

Recently we saw a young man asked to leave a beach restaurant. He was treated with respect and no one made a scene but it was also clear that a muscle shirt was not proper attire, no matter how close the ocean.

As visitors, it is our job to be respectful. We can still have a good time. After all, Mexicans are not quiet. They are very colorful and love to enjoy themselves. One glimpse of a holiday calendar leaves no doubt for their penchant to party. But let’s please not offend the locals while we are at it.

There are constant changes in Puerto Vallarta; some good and some to which we need to make adjustments. This is a simple change and it can be made in the dressing room. I’ll cover for you and you can cover for me.

Que es cómo es.


  Thanks to our Guest Blogger Adam Garcia for this great article!


Mexico is moving in the right direction, working to raise the real estate standards to protect buyer and seller interests. AMPI (our National Real Estate Association) plays a key role in the real estate industry in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, working closely with local, state and national governments. Our local AMPI Association is leading the country in developing and implementing real estate standards.  To become members of our local AMPI Association Real Estate professionals sign our Bylaws that require our members to follow our Ethical Code of Conduct;  to use our contract forms which have been legally vetted to protect buyers and sellers; to participate in and comply with our MLS Rules and Regulation along with using the shared database. Our Bylaws, Code of Ethics, MLS Systems, Contracts and our other systems are constantly improved on through the expertise and experience of our members.  Find a Committed AMPI Professional Here

Hey Vallarta… Whats A Zocalo?

The local zocalo, (from Spanish zócalo socle and from Italian zoccolo) is the main square in any Mexican town, Puerto Vallarta being no exception, and is often the center of much local activity. At “El Jardin Principal”(The Main Garden) as the local plaza is called, on any given evening, decades seem to melt away while gentlemen have their shoes shined, grandmothers feed pigeons, while children run around flapping make-believe wings, and couples dance to music from the kiosko (gazebo). Sundays are reserved for the municipal band to entertain locals and tourists alike. An evening walk, after a late day Mass is the highlight of many families, who stop for treats such as fresh fried churros, ice cream, cotton candy, cheesy corn and other delights in the zocalo and along the Malecón.

On the eve of Dia de Independencia (Independence Day/September 16) this popular plaza will be packed with revelers, waiting for the mayor to come out on the balustrade and give a long-winded, usually repetitive speech, ending with a crowd arousing Viva Mexico! Good times for all involved, with more than the usual abundance of vendors selling dinners, desserts, snacks, trinkets and memorabilia. The night ends with an amazing fireworks display; the Malecón will be full of visitors until the wee hours of the morning and there won’t be much sleep for anyone in the general area.

The most famous zocalo is, of course, in Mexico City, rich with history, tragedy and triumph. Though the zocalo in Puerto Vallarta is quite small in comparison, it is also a well known landmark, meeting place and gathering of special events. It is the heart of all grand festivals like the Christmas Guadalupana (the processions to the cathedral, which take place the first 12 days of December); the Sidewalk Art Competition in November; major holidays such as the aforementioned Independence Day and Revolution Day, Children’s Day, and New Year’s Eve and many other celebrations.

In an effort to maintain the appeal and originality of the downtown village, neon signs are not permitted, the streets are to remain in the old cobblestone style and city regulations make an effort to regulate architecture and other details. Nothing symbolizes tradition quite as well as the La Iglesia de Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe, the Church of our Lady of Guadalupe. With her gorgeous bell tower and luxurious interior, the street and steps to the east lead directly through the front door and to the altar.

The Municipal Building and Tourist Office are also found on the north side of the zocalo and warmly welcome visitors with any inquiries about the city and surrounding area.

Que cómo es es


 Thanks to our Guest Blogger Adam Garcia for this great article!


Harriet Cochran Murray, Director of Cochran Real Estate, is a seasoned Real Estate professional both here in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico and in the United States. Harriet has served in many capacities as a board member and President for the local Real Estate Association AMPI (AMPI is the national association of real estate professionals). She is also a member of FIABCI and NAR in the United States. Harriet’s expertise and experience in the Real Estate and especially in the Mexican market makes her Viewpoint blog articles both informational and intriguing. Harriet is a Buyer’s Agent who specializes in getting the best deal on the right property for her clients.