Real Estate in a Technologically Shifting World

When my mom started Mickie Ardi & Assoc. in 1978, the world of real estate was vastly different than it is today. She built her business on personal face to face client relationships, and to this day she continues to hold those same values. Mickie became a prominent figure in and around the San Fernando Valley with both clients and other real estate professionals. Our office was consistently flooded with business. However, within the last few years there has been a significant change, mainly due to the rise of technology.

Real Estate in a Technologically Shifting World

More and more individuals are foregoing the traditional route of buying and selling through local agencies, turning instead to the immense world of the internet to seek out industry professionals. Any quick search of real estate or buying and selling homes will return pages upon pages of results from your search engine, and there are more ways than ever for individuals to list and sell their homes on free listing websites. As with any industry undergoing changes due to technology, setbacks will happen. How you respond is what matters most.

Creating an online presence is essential in this day and age. Utilizing social media and keeping an updated website are just a couple ways to keep directing traffic to your office. Yet nothing will replace personal client-agent relationships. People buy and sell their homes primarily because of major life events which can be emotional and dramatically alter their trajectory in life, such as a change of career, marriage, divorce, growing families, and retirement.       For many of these people, attempting to go it alone can often be very stressful. Therefore, what we offer as agents is more than just a service. We end up filling many roles, including that of financial advisor, therapist, and close friend. Our focus on our clients as people first gives them the security, confidence, and trust to return to us time and again, not only as returning customers, but as lifelong friends.

Listen to the dreams and goals of your clients and your community. That is the next step to bettering your business. Don’t be afraid to reinvent yourself. Change is necessary, and promotes growth. Do find time every day to build your online presence and participate in the world of social media, but don’t forget about the importance of continuing to build personal relationships within your local community.

Author: Debi Ardi

Why Use AMPI?

AMPI is the national association of real estate professionals that have, since 1956, gathered under laws and codes of ethics and conduct to create a reliable, trustworthy an efficient real estate environment in Mexico.

AMPI consists of separate autonomous sections all throughout the nation, as well as more than 4,000 associates and affiliates.

Each section is independent and has its own board of directors, only surpassed by a national board of directors comprised of twenty associates from all over the republic.

Developed over the years with the

input and knowledge of its members, AMPI is much more than just a collection of offices.

AMPI has been a solid and recognized institution in Mexico for the past 27 years. It was originally established in 1956 and was consolidated in 1980.

AMPI is currently represented in all the principle cities and regions of Mexico stretching from Tijuana to Cancun.

The Riviera Nayarita, Vallarta and Compostela chapters of AMPI are dedicated to promote the best practices in real estate by providing its members with education to reinforce the standards of ethics that give our industry the credibility which our clients deserve.

AMPI is committed to giving our membership access to a multiple listing service that forms the platform from which our industry can expand locally and into other markets while giving our members precise and up to date information that is vital to continuous improvement and growth.

How To Sell Your Home Without Dropping Your Price

When your home is marked down from its original price, it’s a sure sign that your marketing plan failed. Not only have you missed the critical first two weeks when buyers and real estate professionals are most interested, but there’s no way for your home to compete with other homes that are better priced.

No one wants to waste time trying to deal with an unreasonable seller, so lowering the price may not help as much as you may think. Buyers may think something is wrong with the home, or they may decide that there’s room for even more discounts. Real estate professionals won’t get excited when your agent relists your home at a lower price because it’s not a new listing.

 Sell Your Home

If you’re really ready to sell your home, don’t test the market. The best thing for you to do is to price it right in the first place and then sell as close to the original asking price as possible. For the best results, price your home at current fair market value — not where prices were in 2005, or where they might be in 2015.

Current fair market value means your home favorably compares to recent listings and closed sales of homes most similar to yours in size, finishes, amenities and location. It also means your home is on target with price trending. If homes are dropping in price in your area, you may want to set your original price under current fair market values in order to generate more interest from buyers. If prices are trending upward, stay current – don’t price ahead. That only works in the strongest sellers’ markets when banks are more comfortable about rising prices.

Next, make sure that buyers see your home in the best light. Among real estate professionals, the most important considerations is how your home looks from the curb and how it looks online. First impressions require that you spend particular time and attention on curb appeal, from keeping your walks and drives swept, to painting the front door a fresh new color, to putting out a new welcome mat.

Photography can be your home’s best selling tool when it’s done correctly and professionally. Stage the rooms that will be photographed by removing clutter. Fluff the pillows, clear tabletops and countertops, and remove the dog’s water bowl and your children’s toys out of the viewfinder. Take a few digital shots and look for flaws – the rumpled bed, the wastebasket full of paper, or the closet bulging with clothes. Once all the flaws are removed, you’re home is ready for the professional photographer who has the right lighting and equipment to help you market your home.

In homeselling, less is more. You want the home to come forward and your belongings to fade to the background. If you have too much stuff, put the excess in storage. As little as $50 to $250 for short-term storage could make the difference in the buyer’s offer price.

When buyers come to your home, they will be looking for flaws, so make sure the little details are done, especially small repairs. The less that needs to be fixed or replaced, the better maintained and the more move-in ready the home appears to the buyer.

Buyer-friendliness is a factor that can’t be underestimated. If you want a certain price for your home, make sure to give the buyer something extra to make it worth paying full price. Offer to pay closing costs up to a certain amount, or offer to leave the washer, dryer and refrigerator.

It’s not just the home that needs to be attractive. As the seller, you’re part of the whole package. You should appear buyer-friendly, just as your home should appear move-in friendly.

A home that is priced to reflect current market conditions and shows well in person and online will always sell for more than homes that aren’t maintained and marketed as well.

Author: 

Why Use AMPI?

AMPI is the national association of real estate professionals that have, since 1956, gathered under laws and codes of ethics and conduct to create a reliable, trustworthy an efficient real estate environment in Mexico.

AMPI consists of separate autonomous sections all throughout the nation, as well as more than 4,000 associates and affiliates.

Each section is independent and has its own board of directors, only surpassed by a national board of directors comprised of twenty associates from all over the republic.

Developed over the years with the input and knowledge of its members, AMPI is much more than just a collection of offices.

AMPI has been a solid and recognized institution in Mexico for the past 27 years. It was originally established in 1956 and was consolidated in 1980. AMPI is currently represented in all the principle cities and regions of Mexico stretching from Tijuana to Cancun.

The Riviera Nayarita, Vallarta and Compostela chapters of AMPI are dedicated to promote the best practices in real estate by providing its members with education to reinforce the standards of ethics that give our industry the credibility which our clients deserve.

AMPI is committed to giving our membership access to a multiple listing service that forms the platform from which our industry can expand locally and into other markets while giving our members precise and up to date information that is vital to continuous improvement and growth.

Who is my agent?

Quite often potential would be buyers refer to the person they bought their home from as their agent. It sounds reasonable but it is definitely not accurate. Although there are several meanings to the word Agent, let us refer to the definition as a person who works for or manages an agency.

Who is my agent

An example of this would be a person who is the agent of the insurance company and they legally represent the company, not the customer. Even an independent agent who can place a policy with different companies is still an agent of the company.

A mortgage officer, in most cases is an employee and represents the company. In addition, the same is true for a title or escrow officer. It is important to understand the actual relationship to know what you can expect from them. In Real Estate, there is a procedure for the professional to create formal agency relationships. This requires a fiduciary/statutory responsibility that places the principals’ interests above the agent’s own personal interests.

In today’s terms, potential consumers refer to an agent, as “this is my agent.” Unlike other professions, Real Estate is in a different category by itself. Agency disclosure plays a major part in representation, and, unless the potential buyer understands agency relationships, the word agent could be misconstrued.

An agent owes honesty and accountability to a customer. The principal can expect complete disclosure, obedience, loyalty, reasonable skill, care, and confidentiality from their agent.

Understanding agency relationships brings a valuable experience to the buying or selling process to coordinate all aspects of the transaction from start to finish.

Author: RealtyTimes.com

Why Use AMPI?

AMPI is the national association of real estate professionals that have, since 1956, gathered under laws and codes of ethics and conduct to create a reliable, trustworthy an efficient real estate environment in Mexico.

AMPI consists of separate autonomous sections all throughout the nation, as well as more than 4,000 associates and affiliates. Each section is independent and has its own board of directors, only surpassed by a national board of directors comprised of twenty associates from all over the republic.

Developed over the years with the input and knowledge of its members, AMPI is much more than just a collection of offices. AMPI has been a solid and recognized institution in Mexico for the past 27 years. It was originally established in 1956 and was consolidated in 1980. AMPI is currently represented in all the principle cities and regions of Mexico stretching from Tijuana to Cancun.

The Riviera Nayarita, Vallarta and Compostela chapters of AMPI are dedicated to promote the best practices in real estate by providing its members with education to reinforce the standards of ethics that give our industry the credibility which our clients deserve.

AMPI is committed to giving our membership access to a multiple listing service that forms the platform from which our industry can expand locally and into other markets while giving our members precise and up to date information that is vital to continuous improvement and growth.

Being ‘tech-savvy’ is not what gets real estate agents business

I reject the idea that younger people can earn a living as real estate agents just because they are “tech-savvy,” and that this somehow gives them an advantage that enables them to compete with more experienced agents.

I believe that there is plenty of business for agents young and old, and that we should encourage young people to join our profession. But we might be going about it all wrong.

tech savvy

The Internet has been around for more than 30 years. Smartphones have been with us, in one form or another, for 15 years. Before that we had the Palm Pilot.

Many of us “old” agents have evolved, adapted and kept up with the times. Some of us have even been innovators and early adopters of technology like the iPad, which some experts told us would be useless for business.

In some real estate associations and offices, I see an emphasis on having young, “tech-savvy” agents teaching older agents about technology. I think the future of the real estate industry would be better served if older, more experienced agents spent more time teaching younger agents how to be real estate agents.

“Young Professionals Networks” (YPNs) for real estate agents have sprung up all over the country. Many of them offer opportunities for agents to go to bars and parties and social events and network with each other. They also offer occasional educational opportunities that focus on how to use technology.

A better approach might be a formal mentoring program for new agents where they can work with more experienced agents and learn how to sell real estate. They could learn by observing and asking questions and shadowing experienced agents. Groups of agents and mentors could go to the bar once a month and talk about their successes and failures, and learn from each other.

I think the future of the real estate industry would be better served if older, more experienced agents spent more time teaching younger agents how to be real estate agents.”

I started my own career in real estate as a licensed assistant to a top-producing agent so that I could learn the business. The first time I went on a listing appointment it was as an observer. It was like real estate graduate school — or maybe a finishing school, depending upon how I look at it. I was not young when I started.

Even though I had come from a technology company and did not have any trouble with email, the Internet or my first smartphone, there were many things I needed to learn before I could work with clients and sell houses. The agent I worked with was not what we call “tech-savvy,” but he sold circles around me. He still does today.

Being “tech-savvy” is not what gets us business. Knowing how to answer the question, “Why should I work with you?” has to come first.

Even today as I blog for business, it is the content that comes from my own experience that helps me attract clients — not the technology behind the blog platform or the computer I use to manage the whole process.

My biggest challenge was finding people who would work with me. Once I found them, I had to provide services worthy of my exorbitant commission.

My current real estate clients put a much higher value on experience than on the stuff the real estate industry calls “tech-savvy.”

They really don’t care that I use my phone to navigate from house to house and to look up important information as I go. Or that I can write an offer and get it signed on my iPad.

They just want to buy the house, and they want the best deal they can get. They want me to give them advice on how much they money they should offer. My clients are interested in my real estate experience.

Technology improves efficiency, plain and simple. We use it so that we can make more money in less time.

It costs more to write an offer on paper and make copies for all the parties and hand-deliver it to the listing agent than it does to write it on a tablet and email it to everyone. I can make more money in less time because of the Internet, and because I have a phone and a tablet that allow me to bring the Internet with me wherever I go.

Author: Teresa Boardman – Inman.com

Why Use AMPI?

AMPI is the national association of real estate professionals that have, since 1956, gathered under laws and codes of ethics and conduct to create a reliable, trustworthy an efficient real estate environment in Mexico.

AMPI consists of separate autonomous sections all throughout the nation, as well as more than 4,000 associates and affiliates. Each section is independent and has its own board of directors, only surpassed by a national board of directors comprised of twenty associates from all over the republic.

Developed over the years with the input and knowledge of its members, AMPI is much more than just a collection of offices. AMPI has been a solid and recognized institution in Mexico for the past 27 years. It was originally established in 1956 and was consolidated in 1980. AMPI is currently represented in all the principle cities and regions of Mexico stretching from Tijuana to Cancun.

The Riviera Nayarita, Vallarta and Compostela chapters of AMPI are dedicated to promote the best practices in real estate by providing its members with education to reinforce the standards of ethics that give our industry the credibility which our clients deserve.

AMPI is committed to giving our membership access to a multiple listing service that forms the platform from which our industry can expand locally and into other markets while giving our members precise and up to date information that is vital to continuous improvement and growth.

What do Real Estate Agents earning $100K+ spend their time and money on?

At last year’s Real Estate Connect, conference emcees Katie Lance and Chris Smith from Inman News revealed key findings from a recent study on what agents earning $100K+ want, how they work and what they spend their time and money on.

spend their time
Where are the agents of tomorrow generating the most income?

The Top 5

1. Their Past Clients/Referrals

2. Their Website

3. Their Social Media Presence

4. Their Lawn Signs

5. Their Search Engine Efforts

Also, 98% of $100K earners use IDX registration follow-up and email marketing to take a lead to an escrow deposit. It’s time to focus your energy on the strategies that work!

Check out the entire video:

 

Why Use AMPI?

AMPI is the national association of real estate professionals that have, since 1956, gathered under laws and codes of ethics and conduct to create a reliable, trustworthy an efficient real estate environment in Mexico.

AMPI consists of separate autonomous sections all throughout the nation, as well as more than 4,000 associates and affiliates. Each section is independent and has its own board of directors, only surpassed by a national board of directors comprised of twenty associates from all over the republic.

Developed over the years with the input and knowledge of its members, AMPI is much more than just a collection of offices. AMPI has been a solid and recognized institution in Mexico for the past 27 years. It was originally established in 1956 and was consolidated in 1980. AMPI is currently represented in all the principle cities and regions of Mexico stretching from Tijuana to Cancun.

The Riviera Nayarita, Vallarta and Compostela chapters of AMPI are dedicated to promote the best practices in real estate by providing its members with education to reinforce the standards of ethics that give our industry the credibility which our clients deserve.

AMPI is committed to giving our membership access to a multiple listing service that forms the platform from which our industry can expand locally and into other markets while giving our members precise and up to date information that is vital to continuous improvement and growth.