El Zocalo in Puerto Vallarta

El Zocalo

The local zocalo, (from Spanish zócalo socle and from Italian zoccolo) is the main square in any Mexican town, Puerto Vallarta being no exception, and is often the center of much local activity. At “El Jardin Principal”(The Main Garden) as the local plaza is called, on any given evening, decades seem to melt away while gentlemen have their shoes shined, grandmothers feed pigeons, while children run around flapping make-believe wings, and couples dance to music from the kiosko (gazebo). Sundays are reserved for the municipal band to entertain locals and tourists alike. An evening walk, after a late day Mass is the highlight of many families, who stop for treats such as fresh fried churros, ice cream, cotton candy, cheesy corn and other delights in the zocalo and along the Malecón.

On the eve of Dia de Independencia (Independence Day/September 16) this popular plaza will be packed with revelers, waiting for the mayor to come out on the balustrade and give a long-winded, usually repetitive speech, ending with a crowd arousing Viva Mexico! Good times for all involved, with more than the usual abundance of vendors selling dinners, desserts, snacks, trinkets and memorabilia. The night ends with an amazing fireworks display; the Malecón will be full of visitors until the wee hours of the morning and there won’t be much sleep for anyone in the general area.

The most famous zocalo is, of course, in Mexico City, rich with history, tragedy and triumph. Though the zocalo in Puerto Vallarta is quite small in comparison, it is also a well known landmark, meeting place and gathering of special events. It is the heart of all grand festivals like the Christmas Guadalupana (the processions to the cathedral, which take place the first 12 days of December); the Sidewalk Art Competition in November; major holidays such as the aforementioned Independence Day and Revolution Day, Children’s Day, and New Year’s Eve and many other celebrations.

In an effort to maintain the appeal and originality of the downtown village, neon signs are not permitted, the streets are to remain in the old cobblestone style and city regulations make an effort to regulate architecture and other details. Nothing symbolizes tradition quite as well as the La Iglesia de Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe, the Church of our Lady of Guadalupe. With her gorgeous bell tower and luxurious interior, the street and steps to the east lead directly through the front door and to the altar.

The Municipal Building and Tourist Office are also found on the north side of the zocalo and warmly welcome visitors with any inquiries about the city and surrounding area.

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Contribute to and enhance Puerto Vallarta

Five ways you can contribute to and enhance the community

Pick up trash – We aren’t asking you to walk around town with a garbage bag (although that would be extremely appreciated.) Puerto Vallarta once took a lot of pride in being very friendly and clean. Still friendly, the city could use some help with the trash. Puerto Vallarta’s favorite historian, Catalina Montes de Oca de Contreras, wrote of her admiration for the cleanliness of the local people. To this day, you see streets and sidewalks swept and washed daily, but it’s hard to keep up with the human detritus. Please don’t toss out car windows or drop refuse on the streets. There are trash cans everywhere and often you can leave a bag on a street corner and it will be picked up by collectors. When walking the pup, it makes us feel good to pick up more than just her little deposits. We enjoy helping the community, too and pick up what other may have inadvertently dropped.

Be patient – Whether you’re on vacation, seeking a second home while in Puerto Vallarta or just passing through, it’s time to relax. We take relaxation seriously. It is suggested to take a book or magazine when going to the bank or standing in any line. Don’t always expect a have the chance to read though since you may be too distracted by someone who wasn’t able to keep their patience. People who complain loudly are often ignored or stared at and seldom considered worth the bother.

Tip generously – The applicable minimum wage in Puerto Vallarta is approximately 47 pesos a day. Of course, some places pay more, but you should be shocked to realize it doesn’t amount to much. Your food servers, bartenders, maids and others working in the tourist/service industries depend on tips for simple survival. 20% is normal and if you are generous, you will likely be remembered next time you visit an establishment.

Shop – On the beach or streets, in a mall or marina. What can be better than sipping margaritas and watching beautiful people stroll by, while doing your shopping? Please don’t be annoyed with beach vendors. The colorful blankets, tablecloths, puppets, hammocks, wood carvings, clothing, beads and jewelry… are worth the barter. Kiosks on the street with their whimsical pottery, key chains and other flotsam are operated by families who often have children, grandparents as staff. Grocery shopping in Puerto Vallarta is amazing and gentle on the pocketbook. Art in Mexico, from famous galleries to that found on the Malecón, can be easily bundled for shipment home.

Beach musicians – When minstrels sidle up to your table and politely ask if you would like a song, they will nod and walk away when you tell them you’re not interested. However, you should be interested. Why not have a little night music. Or day music, perhaps? These are locals who literally sing for their supper and often are surprisingly talented. Many young people learn how to play an instrument passed down from a parent and have spent their lives exposed to the beautiful folk music of Mexico. Sit back, relax, shop and enjoy the culture. And make sure to pick up after yourself.

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Puerto Vallarta Beach Food

Along with many excellent restaurants in Puerto Vallarta, there are food vendors aplenty and a wonderful variety on the beach. One can sit all day and order fine and delectable fare. A good morning starter is a cup loaded with a mixture of fruit. Melons, papaya, jicama, cucumber, among other juicy choices, all sliced with finger eating in mind; sprinkled with chile or a lime squeeze, or eaten plain. You need to only sit and wait for the fruit person to pass and they’ll be happy to arrange a custom breakfast for you. Our favorite is watermelon mixed with jicama, sprinkled with a tad of Tajin.

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Oysters, fresh or grilled are in constant supply. Waiters weave through crowds collecting pesos for platters, complete with quartered limes, chile and salsa. We’ve found our favorite under the bridge at Playa Los Muertos, where a local family supplies a selection of shellfish, including clams the size of horse hooves. They will concoct a seafood cocktail to order with amazingly fresh salsa.  Breakfast is a good time to enjoy mollusks when they’ve just been whisked out of the ocean.

Roast fish and shrimp are familiar scents wafting, as one strolls in the direction of the beach. Propped over coals, an old tradition that dates back many years, fish on a stick can be seen in old photos of Puerto Vallarta. Facing the sea, our back to the land, nothing has changed, including the good food. Wandering fish sellers, hawking their delicious offerings, are a fanciful temptation, the very type of thing that makes us know we have dining in heaven. Shrimp and fish are served with slices of fresh lime; Salsa Huichol, native to the area, is our preferred condiment.

While lounging on the hot sand, enjoying vistas and marvelous odors, there’s nothing quite like sweet Mexican ice cream. Buried deep in a pushcart full of ice, these mouth-watering treats comes in an assortment not found in most of our hometowns. Paletas (popsicles) of pineapple, guayaba (guava) chockablock with crunchy seeds, cucumber, rum (yes, really, rum), coconut, peanut and walnut are among the exotic flavors, cream and water based. The lid of the rolling freezer is wrenched open and the air is filled with icy mist as the vendor reaches inside and magically pulls out your request, frozen solid. Your tongue will stick to it at first lick, so be careful.

Candy, often sold out of a wheelbarrow, is pushed along by what must be the strongest man on the entire beach and it’s not just yummy, it’s colorful! As well as gummies and sweet and sours, there are jawbreakers, mints, licorice and a selection of nuts. From pistachios to pecans, some are salted while others are covered in caramel and hard sugar. We always get little bags to take home for later.

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South Shore Homes

41 matches found

$760,000
km 14.7 Carretera Mismaloya km 14.7, Casa Gran Día, Puerto Vallarta, JA
View Photos (137)
# of Bedrooms: 6
# of Bathrooms: 10
Square Footage: 9124.48
Area: South Shore
Listing Agent: Gabriel Garcia Bobadilla
Agent Phone: 322-136-4476
Agent Email: gabriel@remaxonthebay.net
Last Updated: September - 25 - 2020
IDX
$1,250,000
106 Coapinole, Casa Aleman, Puerto Vallarta, JA
View Photos (24)
# of Bedrooms: 4
# of Bathrooms: 5
Square Footage: 5692.47
Area: South Shore
Listing Agent: Ronnie Morgan
Agent Phone: 322-150-5471
Agent Email: rmorgannewmex@hotmail.com
Last Updated: September - 24 - 2020
IDX
$1,995,000
2 Coapinole, Casa Linda, Puerto Vallarta, JA
View Photos (18)
# of Bedrooms: 6
# of Bathrooms: 8
Square Footage: 12912
Area: South Shore
Listing Agent: Sherri Narro
Agent Phone: 322-228-0584
Agent Email: sherri@PuertoVallartaDreamHomes.com
Last Updated: September - 22 - 2020
IDX
$875,000
123 Sierra De Los Pinos, Power House, Puerto Vallarta, JA
View Photos (41)
# of Bedrooms: 4
# of Bathrooms: 5
Square Footage: 7712.88
Area: South Shore
Listing Agent: Tonya Dorsey
Agent Phone: 322-135-8914
Agent Email: tonya.dorsey@kwmexico.mx
Last Updated: September - 22 - 2020
IDX
$1,100,000
171 Calle Hortensias, Casa del Angel, Puerto Vallarta, JA
View Photos (26)
# of Bedrooms: 5
# of Bathrooms: 5
Square Footage: 5252.28
Area: South Shore
Listing Agent: Guillermo Cuevas
Agent Phone: 322-688-2169
Agent Email: guillermo@ggpvr.com
Last Updated: September - 22 - 2020
IDX
$775,000
97 Dulce Oliva, Casa Siete Soles, Puerto Vallarta, JA
View Photos (48)
# of Bedrooms: 4
# of Bathrooms: 4
Square Footage: 5343.42
Area: South Shore
Listing Agent: Hugo Padilla
Agent Phone: 322-117-5301
Agent Email: hugo@timothyrealestategroup.com
Last Updated: September - 17 - 2020
IDX
$2,999,000
107 Paseo de las Conchas Chinas, Villa Divina, Puerto Vallarta, JA
View Photos (29)
# of Bedrooms: 9
# of Bathrooms: 13
Square Footage: 17485
Area: South Shore
Listing Agent: Carl Timothy
Agent Phone: 322-223-5300
Agent Email: mls@timothyrealestategroup.com
Last Updated: September - 17 - 2020
IDX
$2,200,000
123 Sagitario, Villa Marea Baja, Puerto Vallarta, JA
View Photos (33)
# of Bedrooms: 3
# of Bathrooms: 6
Square Footage: 4917.32
Area: South Shore
Listing Agent: Sherri Narro
Agent Phone: 322-228-0584
Agent Email: sherri@PuertoVallartaDreamHomes.com
Last Updated: September - 10 - 2020
IDX
$2,700,000
4920 Carr. a Barra de Navidad, Villa Mandarinas, Puerto Vallarta, JA
View Photos (33)
# of Bedrooms: 8
# of Bathrooms: 11
Square Footage: 14988.68
Area: South Shore
Listing Agent: Michael Holland
Agent Phone: 949-302-4911
Agent Email: info@PuertoVallartaVillas.com
Last Updated: September - 10 - 2020
IDX
$15,000,000
9.4 Carr. Barra de Navidad, Vista los Arcos, Puerto Vallarta, JA
View Photos (34)
# of Bedrooms: 5
# of Bathrooms: 10
Square Footage: 13988
Area: South Shore
Listing Agent: Sherri Narro
Agent Phone: 322-228-0584
Agent Email: sherri@PuertoVallartaDreamHomes.com
Last Updated: August - 24 - 2020
IDX

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Riding Bikes in Puerto Vallarta

Bicycles have become very popular over the past few years in Puerto Vallarta, a place that was until a very short time ago, much easier to navigate atop a donkey. We still love donkeys but bikes are a bit more fun, get you there faster and much less stubborn.

Up and down the coastal corridor on Highway 200, enthusiasts will find an abundance of shops willing to sell, rent, repair and suggest areas to explore. There’s no shortage of willing tour guides. Ask at any of the local stores and repair shops and you will be led to enthusiasts who not only know the terrain but are also very familiar with the flora and fauna, eagerly willing to share their knowledge.

Bikes can be rented at a number of shops around town; bike repair and accessories add to a growing commerce in Puerto Vallarta. Bike tours are all the rage but it’s no longer necessary to schlep one’s own equipment, sometimes adding phenomenal amounts to airfare. A common option for those traveling with a bike is to fly first class. For the cost of an upgrade, luggage (including bikes) check in for free. Depending on the airline, three or more pieces are accepted. Also good to know is when checking a bike on a flight involving more than one leg, your bike will travel with you all the way, so once you have checked in to first class on your initial flight, you can fly the rest of the way coach and the bike still goes.

Tips for bike riding in Puerto Vallarta are the same as anywhere in the tropics: Hydrate constantly. Don’t drink water just when you’re thirsty; that can get you in trouble. Eat; every hour is recommended to combat fatigue. Take corners slowly; you never know what’s around the curve…ride with caution and use your brakes. Wear comfortable but appropriate clothing; the sun is brutal and sunstroke is a real consequence of over exposure. Either apply sunscreen or cover your body with long pants, long-sleeved shirts. Helmet! Eye protection! Closed toe shoes! Make sure you have all necessary equipment for a breakdown (tools, tires, pump); great to divide this stuff up when riding with a group. ID! Be sure to carry your identification everywhere you go; a photocopy of your passport is an excellent idea.

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Puerto Vallarta: What Would You Do?

The Mordida

For anyone who asks, if ever pulled over by an officer of the law in Puerto Vallarta, we always advise to keep your money in your pocket and take the ticket. There are still come cops who will accept a bribe (mordida), though we hear and see this practice less and less as the years go by. It seems to be either the older, weathered policemen who do this, or the young, fresh ones trying to make a buck peso on the side.

Here’s how it goes if you decide to take the ticket and not offer a mordida: In many cases, they will simply let you go, give you a harsh warning, (which you will deserve if you were speeding or breaking any other law involving an automobile or motorbike) rather than go to the bother of writing up a citation. They will explain that you must go to the police station to pay. Back in the day, they would take our driver’s license, meaning there was no choice going forward; we had to pay to get it back.

Some people are misled in thinking the authorities in Puerto Vallarta don’t keep computerized records. That’s not true and don’t ever rely on this type of misleading information because it can get you in a lot of trouble, including with any government department….like Aduana (customs), for example.

You will receive a citation written in Spanish, but it will contain your pertinent information, plus the amount of your fine. These tickets don’t amount to much and if you pay within a certain period of time, usually three days, they will actually half it. This means standing in line, sometimes in the hot sun, but the queue moves fast and in the end, you have not broken the law. The address of the station in Puerto Vallarta will be on the ticket and if you have any questions, ask. It is the police officer’s responsibility to make sure you understand and this is a good time to make sure you have his name and badge number.

If you do offer a mordida to a policeman, keep In mind it is illegal, and depending on the time of day, position of the sun, global news, or the mood of your apprehending officer, you could go to jail for doing so. It’s a huge risk to take and one that could ruin your day and that of any passengers who may have accompanied you on your excursion in and around Puerto Vallarta.

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Mexico is moving in the right direction, working to raise the real estate standards to protect buyer and seller interests. AMPI (our National Real Estate Association) plays a key role in the real estate industry in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, working closely with local, state and national governments. Our local AMPI Association is leading the country in developing and implementing real estate standards.  To become members of our local AMPI Association Real Estate professionals sign our Bylaws that require our members to follow our Ethical Code of Conduct;  to use our contract forms which have been legally vetted to protect buyers and sellers; to participate in and comply with our MLS Rules and Regulation along with using the shared database. Our Bylaws, Code of Ethics, MLS Systems, Contracts and our other systems are constantly improved on through the expertise and experience of our members.  Find a Committed AMPI Professional Here



HOW Do You Say That in Puerto Vallarta

HOW Do You Say That?

When a friend asked us to meet her at Sea and Sea, and we said we don’t know where that is, she gave us the crazy monkey look and informed us “It was the place we watched the sunset and drank margaritas!” We scratched our head, shook it back and forth in grave doubt, and denied knowing Sea and Sea. Perhaps it was the tequila?

Before long, it was all straightened out and we had taught her how to say Cuates y Cuetes as best we could, though we admit it is a tongue twister. Cuates y Cuetes is, indeed, a quaint little restaurant on the beach, next to the pier in Puerto Vallarta, where people catch the water-taxi to Yelapa and wait for the performing sun to set. It’s not an easy name for gringos to enunciate; however the effort to call it something other than C and C should respectfully be made.

The Spanish alphabet is an easy one, each individual letter having one basic pronunciation. Once you learn it, you can pronounce any word with grace and ease. There are always acceptations, of course, and the placement of vowels around a consonant does have influence. It’s also prudent to recognize that the Mexican alphabet differs from that in Spain, Costa Rica and other Spanish speaking countries.

The most prevalent mispronounced Spanish word in Puerto Vallarta seems to be Puerto Vallarta. The double-L trips up many a well meaning speaker and Puerto often is turned into porto or porta. Some give up entirely and simply call it PV, an abbreviation that most Mexicans eschew. Locals admire those who make an effort and enjoy taking on the role of teacher. Don’t be embarrassed if a native speaker corrects your Spanish; they do so lovingly.

By the way, cuates is a Spanish word for pals or buddies, which can also mean twins. Cuetes is a word for fireworks but it can also indicate handguns or pistols, as well as drunken persons. So once you have your Spanish down, it’s good to know that it might be open to a lot of interpretation. Good luck! Buena suerte!

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Eek! Termites in Puerto Vallarta?

The first time we witnessed the arrival of The Termites in Puerto Vallarta was at a beach restaurant many years ago. Without as much as a buzz or a hum, a swarm of flying creatures suddenly appeared over our heads, shedding somewhat less than gossamer wings into our Aztec soup. While some of us shrieked the balance of our famished party dug in and scooped out the bothersome diaphanous little things and went on with our meal.

Things haven’t changed and the first appearance of these feisty insects can be a wee bit alarming. Thought they are completely harmless to humans, they do massive damage to structures in Puerto Vallarta. You will note the advent of termite season by the swarms encircling lights, shortly following dusk and they stay around long enough to drop their wings and find someplace to spend the night.

Though some will claim that termites can eat through anything, including concrete, that is an exaggeration. They are known to settle into cracks in concrete, of which houses in Puerto Vallarta are constructed. When cement is poured, either by hand or with large commercial pumps, there are inevitable cracks. The termites will squeeze into these tiny spaces and they don’t need much more than the thickness of a common credit card to find a purchase. It often looks like they have eaten their way through.

Termites are tenacious creatures and are quite capable of creating their own covered freeway to access their realm. If you see what looks like tubes of dirt on either the exterior of interior of your home, you have a termite kingdom in the making. It is good to know however, that any crawl space or crack in a foundation is akin to an engraved invitation to the termite empire. Very few homes in Puerto Vallarta will be found to have carpet because termites will burrow between the material and the floor and stay hidden from sight.

Expansion joints in places where the wall meets doors or windows, corners of homes and businesses are the termites’ 5 Star Hotel. From there, they send workers out to build a community.

We highly recommend periodic inspections. Then an exterminator comes into your home, they will look for any type of insect or rodent that can harm you or your home. They will spot termites and identify trouble spots within a moment’s time. The best thing to do is seal off any entryways and spray at suggested intervals.

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Sleeping Warrior in Puerto Vallarta

The Sleeping Warrior

Fables abound in Mexico and are retold, embellished and treasured by everyone from schoolchildren to grandmothers. Puerto Vallarta, though a younger settlement than perhaps some of the ancient cities in the central part of the country, has many of her own tales full of grandeur and woe.

From any viewpoint in Puerto Vallarta, one can look to the south and see The Sleeping Warrior, a mountain which rolls down the hill to Los Arcos Beach and into the ocean.

Many ferocious battles were fought up and down the coast of The Americas. As legend has it, long before the town existed, a Spanish ship dropped anchor in the harbor to seek replenishments that might be discovered growing wild on the land and also to give her injured warriors a chance to recuperate and heal. These ships often also carried the young lovers and mistresses of their armies.

One dying soldier, a victim of a ferocious encounter with pirates, was being attended to by a beautiful Zapotec Indian girl, who had fallen madly in love with him. The young man was gravely wounded and all efforts to save him proved hopeless, though the girl prayed that her heavily flowing tears would wash away the peril.

Finally, she begged the captain to let them stay ashore and they were gently transported by canoe to the beautiful sandy beach where huge rocks grew out of the sea. The two lovers were left alone as the ship sailed, their fate uncertain.

For several days the girl wandered through the jungle in search of the miracle herb of life. When she felt she had gathered enough, she ventured back to the sand. It was too late. Her lover had died peacefully, his arms by his sides, sleeping into the next world. The young Zapotec girl was devastated, of course, and continued her weeping over this body, while covering him with the massive amount of leaves she had brought back from her trek. Her tears, which had not healed him, now caused the miracle plant to grow higher and higher, until a hill had formed. Over the years, with the imminent growth of the jungle, the hill turned into a mountain, which became known as The Sleeping Warrior.

The beautiful Indian girl floated into the ocean on the crest of her tears, widening the inlet and causing it to be one of the most protected bays in the world.

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Viva La Siesta in Puerto Vallarta

Smile, Dance and Take a Nap!

Have you noticed how friendly everyone is here in Puerto Vallarta? We walk down the street and all the Mexicans we pass bid us a good morning, afternoon or evening, depending on the time of day. “Buen dia“ (have a good day) is often a common parting comment. Everyone smiles! It’s easy to tell tourists and recent arrivals from locals; they stare straight ahead and tend to make one feel invisible. A good lesson to learn from Latin Americans is their amiability, good nature and willingness to lend a hand. We know that in the north if our car battery dies, for example while leaving the lights on in a parking lot, we need to call AAA for a jump. Here in Puerto Vallarta, we can barely get the cables out of the trunk before someone slams on their breaks, jumps out and pops open their hood.

We also love the way Mexicans sing and whistle a tune, when going about their business. The ladies at the lavanderia, where we drop off our dirty laundry, sing love songs while they sort, iron and fold. We pick up our clean clothes and linens and tip extra for the lovely smiles and serenades. Our gardener whistles melodically and when having little jobs done around the house, the abañiles are almost always merrily humming and singing, sometimes in full harmony!

Mexicans love to dance and start lessons as early as kindergarten. They exhibit a constant joyfulness and this carefree movement doesn’t stop with old age. At weddings, birthday parties, quinceañeras and other celebrations, everyone dances and Mexicans broke down gender barriers long before most of us have… they dance with whomever wants to get up and move, be it a grandmother, child or crazy drunk uncle.

Along with the easygoing attitude one finds among Mexicans in Puerto Vallarta is the ability to have a good healthy nap in the afternoon or early evening. We’ve arranged a couple of hammocks around the casa to not just add color but as an inviting place to retire for an hour or so. Traditionally, the most filling meal of the day in Mexico is midday, even though work hours and the loss of traditional afternoon closing times have altered that convention. We continue to honor it, however, with grace, and when clubbing, advise submitting to a “disco nap” enabling one to endure dancing hours. Naps at all daytime hours are healthy and highly recommended.

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From our guest blogger:  Adam Garcia


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Botanical Gardens of Puerto Vallarta

Our Puerto Vallarta Botanical Gardens

The Botanical Gardens of Puerto Vallarta belongs to all of us, even though the curator Robert Price is the founder, developer, property owner and magician of this amazing venue south of town. Beginning with a magnificent yet simple lodge in 2004, Bob and his mother, Betty, who has since left us for heavenly gardens, lived on site when we originally visited. Their quarters were modest and humble, yet splendid and regal, with beds on the upper floor, open to the jungle and a traditional Mexican kitchen lay below in early stages of construction. This building is now called Hacienda de Oro and is the site of a grand restaurant on two levels. Tiles commemorating events, anniversaries, memorials, pets, family, and friends are made to order and have supported some of the Gardens many causes along with adding magnificent color and a treasure of memories.

Weddings are commonplace at the Botanical Gardens of Puerto Vallarta along with a host of lively events such as annual Thanksgiving and Valentine’s dinners, Anniversary commemorations, the Bugambilia Festival, and Member Appreciation Day. There are singular events that include special guest speakers and entertainment, well chosen from local and regional attractions, both professional and amateur.

Recently the Botanical Gardens of Puerto Vallarta won 4th Place in the Ten Best Botanical Gardens of North America, competing with famous gardens such as Atlanta Botanical Gardens, Desert Botanical Gardens in Phoenix, Longwood Gardens in Pennsylvania and the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum of St. Louis.

Forty-six hectares of hiking trails wind in and out of the native jungle/forest above the incredible Holstein Orchid and Vanilla House, Divine Chapel and many other delightful attractions, new and original.

Vallarta Botanical Gardens has developed educational programs for local studies and participates in public environment awareness programs. The Gardens is a haven for bird watchers; both amateur and professional botanists will be delighted by the gathering of exotic plants from around the world. The conservation and propagation of orchids is at the heart of the garden’s mission.

Take the El Tuito bus, available and easily marked at the corner of Aguacate and Carranza in the Romantic Zone; there’s one every thirty minutes. The Vallarta Botanical Gardens is closed on Mondays from April to November but open every other day of the year from 10 am to 6 pm; admission is 100 pesos and school groups can visit at no cost if they have advance reservations. Little ones under four years of age get in for free.

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