Vallarta Culture: Moving Along

As in the phrase “Move along, folks, nothing to see here…” we have found the events of last week somewhat inflated. Puerto Vallarta hosts the North American Travel Journalists Association (NATJA) this year, as the city plays host to their annual conference from May 4-9, 2015. Attendees will observe a city brimming with exciting and fun things to do. Their activities will include special performances of music and dance; zip line tours; water adventures such as fishing, snorkeling, dolphin and whale watching; horseback riding, jungle hikes and ecological tours; beach clubs; golf; and Puerto Vallarta’s incredible cuisine.

May Day has been a time for protest and demonstrations since the USA and their unions first called for the introduction of an eight-hour work day by forming a general strike to press for these demands in 1886. Businesses normally are closed on this day, in Puerto Vallarta as well as cities all over the world. This year, demonstrators clashed with police in Istanbul, Turkey; Milan, Italy; Seattle, Washington, USA, resulting in scores of arrests and injuries. Istanbul’s Taksim Square had 10,000 police stationed around its perimeter.

In Puerto Vallarta six guys in two pickup trucks drove to three banks, busted the windows and tossed Molotov cocktails through the doors. Those were their weapons. As afore mentioned, the banks were closed, empty. This group also set fires at five gas stations. Storage tanks did not blow up and the perpetrators warned everyone to get out of their way to avoid harm and injury. It is rumored these incidents were carried out by the Jalisco New Generation Cartel to show how quickly they can mobilize. They also were reportedly responsible for events in other areas of Jalisco and neighboring states.

Social media is not a reliable source for our news. Facebook was the only place the fires of Puerto Vallarta were difficult to extinguish. Amazingly, an automobile on the Guadalajara-Colima highway overheated and was reported, repeatedly, as cartel activity. News in the USA was highly focused on news of the day that six Baltimore police officers had been charged in the death of a citizen.

The evening of May 1 in Puerto Vallarta found people on the beaches, walking the Malecón and filling bars and restaurants. Locally the query of the day was where to watch the Mayweather vs. Pacquiao fight, which turned out to be as humdrum as the 6’O’Clock news in Puerto Vallarta.

We expect the North American Travel Journalists Association (NATJA) to report that Puerto Vallarta is, indeed, all it’s purported to be: [Truly a world class tourist destination, named “Friendliest City” by Conde Nast in 2001, “Best place in the world to retire” by AARP (North American Association of Retired Persons), “Best Vacation Destination in Mexico” by USNews.com in 2010, “Most Romantic Place in Mexico” and “Favorite Beach Destination in

Mexico” by About.com in 2012, “Best place for Conventions” in a convention marketing magazine and listed in “Top 10 Destinations in Mexico” by TripAdvisor in 2015].

Que es cómo es.


Mexico is moving in the right direction, working to raise the real estate standards to protect buyer and seller interests. AMPI (our National Real Estate Association) plays a key role in the real estate industry in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, working closely with local, state and national governments. Our local AMPI Association is leading the country in developing and implementing real estate standards.  To become members of our local AMPI Association Real Estate professionals sign our Bylaws that require our members to follow our Ethical Code of Conduct;  to use our contract forms which have been legally vetted to protect buyers and sellers; to participate in and comply with our MLS Rules and Regulation along with using the shared database. Our Bylaws, Code of Ethics, MLS Systems, Contracts and our other systems are constantly improved on through the expertise and experience of our members.  Find a Committed AMPI Professional Here

Vallarta Culture: Covering Up

Amazingly, we see tourists in Puerto Vallarta in grocery stores and shopping malls wandering around in bikinis! Aside from being cold, some are simply not easy on the eye. We can say the same thing about fellows walking down streets (that are not located on or even near the beach) wearing those teeny tiny revealing swimsuits. Leaving nothing to the imagination is not a normal Mexican practice,Mexican men may pull up their t-shirt on very hot days, exposing their tummies (certainly not attractive, and slightly offensive) but they will not go around the streets shirtless. The beach boys, surfers and fishermen wear shirts and would never dream of parading around in a speedo.Mexicans take service very seriously and, unless one is in a fine dining establishment, it is unlikely they would ask someone to cover up, but they aren’t amused and will have some trouble communicating with a skimpily dressed customer.

Mexico is primarily a Catholic country. Until recently, women wouldn’t go into a church without a head covering and older ladies still insist on wearing a mantilla on their head. They will openly stare in disdain at young ladies who have no modesty.

Recently we saw a young man asked to leave a beach restaurant. He was treated with respect and no one made a scene but it was also clear that a muscle shirt was not proper attire, no matter how close the ocean.

As visitors, it is our job to be respectful. We can still have a good time. After all, Mexicans are not quiet. They are very colorful and love to enjoy themselves. One glimpse of a holiday calendar leaves no doubt for their penchant to party. But let’s please not offend the locals while we are at it.

There are constant changes in Puerto Vallarta; some good and some to which we need to make adjustments. This is a simple change and it can be made in the dressing room. I’ll cover for you and you can cover for me.

Que es cómo es.


  Thanks to our Guest Blogger Adam Garcia for this great article!


Mexico is moving in the right direction, working to raise the real estate standards to protect buyer and seller interests. AMPI (our National Real Estate Association) plays a key role in the real estate industry in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, working closely with local, state and national governments. Our local AMPI Association is leading the country in developing and implementing real estate standards.  To become members of our local AMPI Association Real Estate professionals sign our Bylaws that require our members to follow our Ethical Code of Conduct;  to use our contract forms which have been legally vetted to protect buyers and sellers; to participate in and comply with our MLS Rules and Regulation along with using the shared database. Our Bylaws, Code of Ethics, MLS Systems, Contracts and our other systems are constantly improved on through the expertise and experience of our members.  Find a Committed AMPI Professional Here

Recent AMPI Meeting at Villa Verde!


Mexico is moving in the right direction, working to raise the real estate standards to protect buyer and seller interests. AMPI (our National Real Estate Association) plays a key role in the real estate industry in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, working closely with local, state and national governments. Our local AMPI Association is leading the country in developing and implementing real estate standards.  To become members of our local AMPI Association Real Estate professionals sign our Bylaws that require our members to follow our Ethical Code of Conduct;  to use our contract forms which have been legally vetted to protect buyers and sellers; to participate in and comply with our MLS Rules and Regulation along with using the shared database. Our Bylaws, Code of Ethics, MLS Systems, Contracts and our other systems are constantly improved on through the expertise and experience of our members.  Find a Committed AMPI Professional Here

Vallarta Culture: The Siesta

One of our favorite and greatest habits that have been confirmed while living in Mexico is that “only mad dogs and Englishmen go out in the midday sun.” It validates our position on how important the power nap is to a good physical existence. Before our current residency in Puerto Vallarta, we confused ambition with folly and seemed driven to prove our success. One does not need to become a slave to one’s own aspirations to maintain grand achievements. Relaxation is endemic among the successful. Several reports indicate that those who nap have less risk of heart attack and it’s the smart choice as a way tour extend social life and enjoy holidays evenings.

Studies have shown that Mexicans and Japanese are the hardest working cultures, putting to bed the image of a large belly under a sombrero sleeping beneath a cactus. Therefore, the siesta should never be viewed as a symbol of laziness but one of intelligent and healthy behavior. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) claims that Mexicans devote an average of ten hours per day to paid and unpaid work. The siesta has been around since the beginning of time, when smart people in hot climates, such as Puerto Vallarta, sleep through the hottest part of the day and eat a light dinner in the cool evening hours, after the sun has gone down.

The word siesta comes from the Latin hora sexta, which means the six hour. In a more reasonable era a day actually began at dawn, making the sixth hour noon, a perfect time to have a rest and collect one’s thoughts, following what should be the grandest meal of the day. Practiced in the Mediterranean and the South of Europe (riposo in Italy), as well as the Philippines and much of Latin America, it is common for businesses to close, giving both proprietors and guests a chance to stay at home, have a long and hearty lunch, and a well deserved rest. Siesta is not limited to countries with warm climates; many locations in South America, such as Patagonia, make it a practice.

When homeostatic sleep and circadian rhythms, the subjects of sleep, are the topic of talk shows and scientific studies, we know we have made the correct choice of living in the paradise we find in Puerto Vallarta.

Que es cómo es.


Mexico is moving in the right direction, working to raise the real estate standards to protect buyer and seller interests. AMPI (our National Real Estate Association) plays a key role in the real estate industry in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, working closely with local, state and national governments. Our local AMPI Association is leading the country in developing and implementing real estate standards.  To become members of our local AMPI Association Real Estate professionals sign our Bylaws that require our members to follow our Ethical Code of Conduct;  to use our contract forms which have been legally vetted to protect buyers and sellers; to participate in and comply with our MLS Rules and Regulation along with using the shared database. Our Bylaws, Code of Ethics, MLS Systems, Contracts and our other systems are constantly improved on through the expertise and experience of our members.  Find a Committed AMPI Professional Here

Vallarta Culture: Shopping

Puerto Vallarta, Mexico – In years past, shopping in Puerto Vallarta was an adventure that took us all over town, beginning in the early morning, extending through the afternoon as we made several stops. We traveled in style in our roomy combi (VW mini-bus), which had a side door that refused to close properly. No problem; we simply found someone to watch the combi and paid a security fee of ten pesos. These guards usually were denizens of the neighborhood, well on in age and knew everyone in town.

Customarily, our first stop was always Don Chuy on Aquiles Serdán across from the Rio Cuale. A well-stocked liquor store, Don Chuy supplied us with bottles of tequila, rum, vodka, gin, triple sec and Grand Marnier for our margaritas. Now we find those supplies at Vinos América on Basilio Badillo. Super la Playa is also a good place to purchase liquor, and there are often great sales at the grocery stores.

For wine, we often head over to Cork and Bottle at Los Mercados on the west end of Aquiles Serdán. Discounts for cases and chilled wine are a specialty. While we’re there we stop in at Don Fresco to check out prices on produce and perhaps pick up spices and grains we can’t find elsewhere. Mikey’s, in the same location, offers wonderful sliced meats, deli items and will whip up a delicious sandwich to sustain us during our journey.

The famed, now closed, and sorely missed, Rizo sits empty and forlorn. Though constant rumors tell of corporate takeover and a Soriana or the like in the south end, our understanding is the streets are prohibitive from allowing the large supply trucks.

Ground coffee and whole beans were once nearly impossible to find in Puerto Vallarta. Now we fulfill this need with several great competitors, including K’Rico, also located in Los Mercados. Coffee from The Hacienda Jalisco is another one of our favorites, when it is available.

We still buy fresh fish daily off the pangas (boats). Fishermen come in about noon until around 4 pm, often dropping their daily catch in contracted restaurants. If bargaining on the beach is not your cup of tea, there are wonderful pescaderias; our preferences are in the mercado at Palmar de Aramara, the fish vendor next to the Rosita Hotel on the Malecón, and in the south end on Calle Constitución, across from where we used to shop at Rizo. Shrimp is seldom local and usually comes to town frozen from places like San Blas and Mazatlán.

For everything from ham and bacon to custom-cut beef and pork, meat is still the best quality and bargain in Puerto Vallarta at Carnicería Colin on Venustiano Carranza. Be sure to ask what is fresh for the day; you might get the chance to barbeque goat!

Some prefer the convenience of the big grocery stores like Soriana and Mega, while others love the convenience of running into an OXXO, or even Farmacía Guadalajara, both of which supply most daily needs. For an adventure, however, we recommend the old fashioned style of shopping… but don’t forget to bring your own bags.


 Thanks to our Guest Blogger Adam Garcia for this great article!


Mexico is moving in the right direction, working to raise the real estate standards to protect buyer and seller interests. AMPI (our National Real Estate Association) plays a key role in the real estate industry in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, working closely with local, state and national governments. Our local AMPI Association is leading the country in developing and implementing real estate standards.  To become members of our local AMPI Association Real Estate professionals sign our Bylaws that require our members to follow our Ethical Code of Conduct;  to use our contract forms which have been legally vetted to protect buyers and sellers; to participate in and comply with our MLS Rules and Regulation along with using the shared database. Our Bylaws, Code of Ethics, MLS Systems, Contracts and our other systems are constantly improved on through the expertise and experience of our members.  Find a Committed AMPI Professional Here

Vallarta Culture: 4 Taste Treats Only Found Here

Ah, the fruits and vegetables of Mexico. We love the unique shopping experiences and bringing home food that we are not always certain how to prepare or eat. Learning about these new delectables has been a fun and usually delicious experience.

Our first tomatillo (pronounced toe-mo-tio), also known as the Mexican husk tomato, landed in the fruit basket with absolutely no idea what it was or how to prepare it. A knowledgeable friend and neighbor educated us properly and with huge delight we learned to make delicious green salsas, just like those we formerly purchased in a tin can!

Jicama (pronounced hic-a-ma) resembles the familiar turnip and has a similar texture when cut open. Unlike the turnip however, it is crispy and sweet and a wonderful addition to any salad, be it fruit or vegetable based. Often found in fruit cups one buys on the street or beach in Puerto Vallarta, jicama is devilishly delicious, sliced and sprinkled with chile and lime juice. Our favorite combination is with cucumber and watermelon. Peel the thick brown skin before eating.

Chayote (pronounced chai-o-tee), also known as christophene, is a pale green vegetable, part of the melon and squash families. Though rare in US markets, chayote is very common fare on the dining tables in Puerto Vallarta and all of Mexico. An excellent source of Vitamin C, it can be peeled or cooked with skin on. We like it mixed with other vegetables in a side dish and not crazy about eating it raw in salads. However, it is delicious when served with carrots and other vegetables in an escabeche sauce. Some like it mashed, as one might serve potatoes or yams, but this process requires more seasoning than we think it deserves.

If you’re looking for guanabana (pronounced wanabana) in the USA, you will most likely find it under the name of soursop, if you find it at all. Guanabana is available at any local market in Puerto Vallarta and we like it sometimes as a tasty treat to serve to guests willing to try something new. With an oddly prickly outer layer, we have heard it described as tasting like strawberry, banana, soft coconut and/or having a citrus flavor. Best to try it yourself… using a sharp knife, slice it open, remove the seeds and eat as you would any melon, cut in small bite-sized pieces. Guanabana is often promoted as graviola, an alternative treatment for cancer, though there is no medical evidence that it is effective.

Que es cómo es.


Mexico is moving in the right direction, working to raise the real estate standards to protect buyer and seller interests. AMPI (our National Real Estate Association) plays a key role in the real estate industry in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, working closely with local, state and national governments. Our local AMPI Association is leading the country in developing and implementing real estate standards.  To become members of our local AMPI Association Real Estate professionals sign our Bylaws that require our members to follow our Ethical Code of Conduct;  to use our contract forms which have been legally vetted to protect buyers and sellers; to participate in and comply with our MLS Rules and Regulation along with using the shared database. Our Bylaws, Code of Ethics, MLS Systems, Contracts and our other systems are constantly improved on through the expertise and experience of our members.  Find a Committed AMPI Professional Here

Vallarta Culture: The Siesta

Learning about la Siesta was one of our favorite lessons when we arrived in Puerto Vallarta many years ago. With the coming warmer months, we will schedule this activity as mandatory, in a binding contract with our very own self, knowing full well the pup is willing to sign on, as well.

As it’s well known that “only mad dogs and Englishmen go out in the midday sun” we’ve taken the sensible position of how important a power nap is to one’s existence, man or beast. One does not need to become slave to one’s own aspirations in order to sustain grand achievements. Relaxation is endemic among the successful. Several reports indicate that those who nap have less risk of heart attack and maintain better health.

Famous nappers have included Winston Churchill, John F. Kennedy, Thomas Edison and Napoleon. The eccentric Spanish artist, Salvador Dali had his siesta perfected, as did Einstein, with a method taught by Capuchin monks, in which sleep in limited to the amount of time it takes to drop a key on a brass plate. Though we recommend a longer duration, this was a technique that not only restored energy, but also rejuvenated the creative process. One sits in a chair and holds a key between thumb and forefinger, sits back in a relaxing manner and awakes with a start to the sound of clang on metal. One second is apparently sufficient. We prefer a hammock in the shade, after a cheerful shot of tequila.

Studies have shown that Mexicans and Japanese are the hardest working cultures, putting to bed the image of a large belly under a sombrero sleeping beneath a cactus. Therefore, the siesta should never be viewed as a symbol of laziness but one of intelligent and healthy behavior. The siesta has been around since the beginning of time, when smart people in hot climates, such as Puerto Vallarta, sleep through the hottest part of the day and eat a light dinner in the cool evening hours, after the sun’s gone down.

The word siesta comes from the Latin hora sexta, which means the six hour. In a more reasonable era a day actually began at dawn, making the sixth hour noon, a perfect time to have a rest and collect one’s thoughts, following what should be the grandest meal of the day. Practiced in the Mediterranean and the South of Europe (riposo in Italy), as well as the Philippines and much of Latin America, it is common for businesses to close, giving both proprietors and guests a chance to stay at home, have a long and hearty lunch, and a well deserved rest. Siesta is not limited to countries with warm climates; many locations in South America, such as Patagonia, make it a practice.

When homeostatic sleep and circadian rhythms, the subjects of sleep, are the topic of talk shows and scientific studies, we know we have made the correct choice of living in the paradise we find in Puerto Vallarta.

Que es cómo es.


Mexico is moving in the right direction, working to raise the real estate standards to protect buyer and seller interests. AMPI (our National Real Estate Association) plays a key role in the real estate industry in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, working closely with local, state and national governments. Our local AMPI Association is leading the country in developing and implementing real estate standards.  To become members of our local AMPI Association Real Estate professionals sign our Bylaws that require our members to follow our Ethical Code of Conduct;  to use our contract forms which have been legally vetted to protect buyers and sellers; to participate in and comply with our MLS Rules and Regulation along with using the shared database. Our Bylaws, Code of Ethics, MLS Systems, Contracts and our other systems are constantly improved on through the expertise and experience of our members.  Find a Committed AMPI Professional Here

Vallarta Culture: The Local Art Scene is in Full Bloom

Puerto Vallarta, a true paradise with its cultural and artistic ambiance, is home to artists and lovers of culture, from all over the world, inspired by the blend of romance and beauty which drew them in the first place and whose attraction keeps them here. The vibrant artistic scene is reflected in the large number of galleries, public sculptures and cultural festivals which the city offers all year long.

Dozens of art galleries have established residence in the historic and charming Romantic Zone, with painting, photography, sculpture, stained glass, ceramics and jewelry exhibits created by some of the best national and international artists.

OUTDOOR ART

More than 15 sculptures by some of the most famous Mexican artists, among them Ramiz Barquet, Sergio Bustamante and Alejandro Colunga, create an impressive art space all along the Malecon. Some of the sculptures represent the life of important historic personalities, others are a reflection of culture and life in Puerto Vallarta; they offer the ideal backdrop for taking unforgettable pictures.

Painter Manuel Lepe (1936-1984), born in Puerto Vallarta and internationally known, mainly created landscapes in and around the city in his Naif style. Lepe, icon of the arts in Puerto Vallarta, captured the light, simplicity and beauty of the city before it became a popular tourist center. His art can be found all over town in many of the galleries and in the beautiful mural in City Hall.

The Cuale Cultural Center is a lively music and art location which offers music, voice, painting, sculpture, theater and photography classes to the public.

The Los Mangos Library also offers dance, performing arts, music, reading and language workshops.

The Xiutla Ballet, which originated in Puerto Vallarta, includes more than 300 children and young people in its very touching dances, performed locally and internationally. Their free performances are every Friday at 7:30 p.m. at the Lazaro Cardenas Plaza by Olas Altas, and on Sundays at 8 p.m. at “Los Arcos” on the Malecon.

FESTIVALS AND CULTURAL EVENTS IN PUERTO VALLARTA

Many Festivals and Events of all kinds are held every year in Puerto Vllarta, these are some of them:

  • Art Walk (Every Wednesday October to May)
  • Southside Shuffle (Every other Friday from November to April)
  • National Charro Championship (February and March)
  • Wine Fest (March)
  • Vallarta Bird Festival (March)
  • Athletic Half Marathon and Race (March)
  • International Encounter of Poets and the Arts ‘Letras en la Mar’ (April)
  • Restaurant Week (May)
  • Vallarta Cup (May)
  • International Altruism Festival (May)
  • The Bougainvillea Festival (May)
  • Independence Day Celebrations (September)
  • Day of the Dead Activities (1st and 2nd of November)
  • International Fishing Tournament (November)
  • International Gourmet Festival (November)
  • Our Lady of Guadalupe Processions (December)
  • End of the Year Festivities (December)

 


Mexico is moving in the right direction, working to raise the real estate standards to protect buyer and seller interests. AMPI (our National Real Estate Association) plays a key role in the real estate industry in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, working closely with local, state and national governments. Our local AMPI Association is leading the country in developing and implementing real estate standards.  To become members of our local AMPI Association Real Estate professionals sign our Bylaws that require our members to follow our Ethical Code of Conduct;  to use our contract forms which have been legally vetted to protect buyers and sellers; to participate in and comply with our MLS Rules and Regulation along with using the shared database. Our Bylaws, Code of Ethics, MLS Systems, Contracts and our other systems are constantly improved on through the expertise and experience of our members.  Find a Committed AMPI Professional Here

Vallarta Culture: How Safe is Vallarta?

The United States has no travel advisories for News Orleans, yet millions of people travel there every year. New Orleans, a single US city, has triple the homicide rate per capita, than all of the entire country of Mexico. Orlando, Florida, the home of Disneyworld, has one of the highest murder rates in the USA. There is simply no comparison to any resort destination in Mexico, including Puerto Vallarta.

The plain fact that so many ex-pats choose to live in Puerto Vallarta, over other suitable destinations in Mexico, is further proof of stability. These are principally retired, affluent, and a well-informed group. They have selected their retirement home carefully and many vehemently maintain its safety.

Texans are safer in Mexico than they are in Texas, thought they may defend their right to the death to say differently. This happens to be the case for all US citizens, who are less likely to face violence in Mexico than in any populated city within their home state.

Aggression and hostility in Mexico are mainly associated with drug crime and arms trade; statistics show that most of these crimes occur in border towns, far from tourist destinations such as Puerto Vallarta. Americans murdered in Mexico, according to FBI numbers, regardless of any connection to drug or gun trafficking, is less than half the US national rate.

We have chatted with travelers whose experience has been limited to a day trip to Tijuana, the quaint Mexican city that borders San Diego, California. We highly recommend extending such adventures further, noting that Baja California Sur isn’t even on the State Department’s warning list, along with most of Mexico, a vast country that is made up of thirty-one unique and magical states.

Millions of US citizens travel to Mexico, visiting all-inclusive resorts, small villages, mountains and beaches, history-rich Mexico City with its amazing museums and

architecture. The unique culture, music, food, art, friendly and relaxed atmosphere are a delightful holiday and all are welcome.

According to the US State Department: “There is no recommendation against travel to Guadalajara and Puerto Vallarta. There is also no recommendation against travel on principal highways in Jalisco between Guadalajara including the portions that cross into the southern portions of the state of Nayarit.”

Que es cómo es.


Mexico is moving in the right direction, working to raise the real estate standards to protect buyer and seller interests. AMPI (our National Real Estate Association) plays a key role in the real estate industry in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, working closely with local, state and national governments. Our local AMPI Association is leading the country in developing and implementing real estate standards.  To become members of our local AMPI Association Real Estate professionals sign our Bylaws that require our members to follow our Ethical Code of Conduct;  to use our contract forms which have been legally vetted to protect buyers and sellers; to participate in and comply with our MLS Rules and Regulation along with using the shared database. Our Bylaws, Code of Ethics, MLS Systems, Contracts and our other systems are constantly improved on through the expertise and experience of our members.  Find a Committed AMPI Professional Here

Vallarta Culture: What is Talavera?

Talavera is normally three times more costly than other types of ceramic crafted in Mexico. What makes it so valuable is something we set out to discover when our friends visiting Puerto Vallarta inquired about this pricier pottery.

Though Talavera was originally brought to Mexico from Spain by several key potters, chiefly among them Diego Gaytán, the design and form were highly affected by other influences. From earlier styles by the Moors, introduction in Spain of Islamic pottery and Italian art forms and later the addition of pre-Hispanic traditional ceramics, a unique blueprint developed. Cathedrals and monasteries were in high demand for tiles during the early colonial period. It was only a matter of time before local artisans were recruited to produce what today is known as Talavera Poblana, which distinguishes it from the Spanish original.

Though these ceramics are available in Puerto Vallarta, the heart of Talavera in Mexico remains in the city of Puebla and surrounding communities of Atlixco, Cholula, and Tecali. Due to their high quality of natural clay, it has long been accepted that Puebla has the corner on the market, though other Mexican states, such as Guanajuato in 1997, have petitioned and been denied the privilege and are reduced to the designation of Maiolica, which is in part the process of making Talavera. The Denominación de Origen de la Talavera, the law established in the early 20th Century, protects authenticity. Certification is issued by the Consejo Regulador de la Talavera, a rigid government authority. The nine official workshops of Talavera are Uriate, La Reyna, Armando, Celia, Santa Catarina, de la Nueva España, de la Luz, de las Americas, and Virglio Perez. Before one buys, it’s vital to assure the purchase bears one of these names. To guarantee dishes are safe for daily use of serving food, production must submit to and pass inspections twice a year. Sixteen laboratory tests with internationally certified labs are performed, as well as a test by the Faculty of Sciences of the University of Puebla.

The thin white base glaze is what sets Talavera apart from other ceramics. The natural glazes contain tin and lead but they do not affect the utilization of dinnerware. They must never be cleaned in a dishwasher or used in a microwave. Blue, yellow, black, green, orange and mauve are the official colors of Talavera and none others are permitted. The base of every piece is left exposed and unglazed, exposing the natural terra cotta. To identify a true piece of Talavera, one must find an inscription on the bottom of the manufacturer’s logo, the initials of the artist and the location of the workshop in the Puebla area. Handcrafting takes at least three months, involving a precarious procedure, which risks the piece breaking at any point of the process.

We highly recommend a keepsake of Talavera, a Mexican art that goes back over 400 years. Shops in Puerto Vallarta will be willing to ship or wrap for traveling.

Que es cómo es.


Mexico is moving in the right direction, working to raise the real estate standards to protect buyer and seller interests. AMPI (our National Real Estate Association) plays a key role in the real estate industry in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, working closely with local, state and national governments. Our local AMPI Association is leading the country in developing and implementing real estate standards.  To become members of our local AMPI Association Real Estate professionals sign our Bylaws that require our members to follow our Ethical Code of Conduct;  to use our contract forms which have been legally vetted to protect buyers and sellers; to participate in and comply with our MLS Rules and Regulation along with using the shared database. Our Bylaws, Code of Ethics, MLS Systems, Contracts and our other systems are constantly improved on through the expertise and experience of our members.  Find a Committed AMPI Professional Here